NGC 3344: Hubble sees galaxy in a spin

October 22, 2012

(Phys.org)—NGC 3344 is a glorious spiral galaxy around half the size of the Milky Way, which lies 25 million light-years distant. We are fortunate enough to see NGC 3344 face-on, allowing us to study its structure in detail.

The galaxy features an outer ring swirling around an inner ring with a subtle bar structure in the center. A bar is an elongated distribution of stars and gas in the center of a . The central regions of the galaxy are predominately populated by young stars, with the galactic fringes also featuring areas of active star formation.

Central bars are found in around two thirds of spiral galaxies. NGC 3344's is clearly visible here, although it is not as dramatic as in some galaxies.

The high density of stars in galaxies' central regions gives them enough to affect the movement of other stars in their galaxy. However, NGC 3344's outer stars are moving in an unusual manner, although the presence of the bar cannot entirely account for this, leaving astronomers puzzled. It is possible that in its past NGC 3344 passed close by another galaxy and acquired stars from it, but more research is needed to state this with confidence.

The image is a combination of exposures taken in visible and near-, using Hubble's for Surveys. The field of view is around 3.4 by 3.4 arcminutes, or around a tenth of the diameter of the full moon.

Explore further: An elegant galaxy in an unusual light (w/ Video)

More information: Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

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4 comments

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Tuxford
1 / 5 (9) Oct 22, 2012
Young stars would populate the central region naturally if the core is primary source of galactic growth. LaViolette's SubQuantum Kinectics predicts a limiting distance for gravitational influence, perhaps around 10K LYrs. This might help explain the puzzling discrepancy between the inner and out regions hinted at in this incomplete press release.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (12) Oct 22, 2012
The "subtle" bar structure is a predictable feature of the electric model of galaxies, as well as the rotation.
wavettore
1 / 5 (10) Oct 22, 2012
New and old Science
A new and Progressive Science shows how Wavevolution, or the transformation from waves to atoms, is the connecting link that closes the circle of science to open our eyes toward new horizons never seen before.
The bureaucracy of traditional science prevents the recognition of any event unless certain criteria are first met. The problem of this science is buried deep in the compilation of these "laws" or criteria introduced by a few scientists in the name of all science and from their erroneous understanding of the relation between Space and Time. This antiquated system of rules also results in misleading theories.
Shinobiwan Kenobi
3 / 5 (4) Oct 25, 2012
New and old Science
A new and Progressive Science shows how Wavevolution, or the transformation from waves to atoms, is the connecting link that closes the circle of science to open our eyes toward new horizons never seen before.
The bureaucracy of traditional science prevents the recognition of any event unless certain criteria are first met. The problem of this science is buried deep in the compilation of these "laws" or criteria introduced by a few scientists in the name of all science and from their erroneous understanding of the relation between Space and Time. This antiquated system of rules also results in misleading theories.


Bold claims; please elucidate upon the failings of the current system and the ways the alternative system you mentioned are demonstrably superior, and please don't forget post links to support your argument.

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