NASA sees rainfall pushed away from Tropical Storm Anais' center

October 16, 2012
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Anais on Oct. 16 at 0654 UTC (2:54 a.m. EDT), light to moderate rainfall (green and blue) was occurring southeast of the center and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There no areas of heavy rainfall, indicating that the storm had weakened since the previous day. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

Satellite imagery from NASA's TRMM satellite showed that wind shear is pushing the bulk of rainfall away from the center of Tropical Storm Anais.

When NASA's Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Anais on Oct. 16 at 0654 UTC (2:54 a.m. EDT), light to moderate rainfall was occurring southeast of the center and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. The displacement of rainfall from around the storm's center to the southeast indicates moderate to strong northwesterly wind shear.There no areas of heavy rainfall, indicating that the storm had weakened since the previous day.

Forecasters at the Joint noted "the TRMM image depicts tightly-curved, shallow convective (thunderstorm) banding wrapping into a well-defined center with deep convective banding limited to the south quadrant."

Tropical Storm Anais had near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph) on Oct. 16 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). Anais was located near 14.4 South and 59.8 East, about 500 nautical miles (575 miles/926 km) north-northeast of La Reunion and moving toward the west-southwest at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph).

Anais is forecast to continue tracking to the west-southwest toward Madagascar, while weakening.

Explore further: NASA sees heaviest rainfall in Tropical Storm Maliski's eastern side

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PhotonX
not rated yet Oct 16, 2012
I can't recall what agency is responsible for naming tropical storms, but it seems to me that Anais is a really unfortunate name. I hope it isn't pronounced like I imagine. Or are we about to put the phrase "the brown eye of the storm" into popular use?

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