NASA catches last image of Rafael as a hurricane, now merged with front

Oct 18, 2012
This visible image of Hurricane Rafael in the North Atlantic was taken from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 17 at 1440 UTC (10:40 a.m. EDT). Rafael's northwestern fringe clouds were brushing Nova Scotia, Canada (top left). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Hurricane Rafael is no longer a tropical cyclone. The storm merged with a cold front on Oct. 18, but not before NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm when it was in its last day as a hurricane.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra captured a of Hurricane Rafael in the North Atlantic on Oct. 17 at 1440 UTC (10:40 a.m. EDT). Although Rafael was far from land, its northwestern fringe clouds were brushing Nova Scotia, Canada.

By 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 17, Rafael had become extra-tropical, meaning that its core changed from a warm system to a cold system, just like a typical mid-latitude low pressure system. At that time, Rafael had near 75 mph (120 kph). It was centered near 40.2 North latitude and 56.5 West longitude, about 475 miles (750 km) southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Rafael was moving to the northeast at 35 mph (56 kph). Turn toward the east-northeast with some increase in forward speed later today, Oct 18.

The National Hurricane Center noted that ocean swells generated by the cyclone are expected to affect the coast of eastern Canada during today and tomorrow. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and .

By 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 18, the cold front was found to be merged with the tropical cyclone, making it extra-tropical. Rafael is expected to complete a cyclonic loop around a deep-layer low over the north-central Atlantic day or two and ride into hurricane history.

Explore further: Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Satellite sees large Hurricane Rafael battering Bermuda

Oct 16, 2012

Hurricane Rafael is a large hurricane and Bermuda has battened down for Rafael's battering today, Oct. 16. NOAA's GOES-14 satellite revealed Rafael's large span that covers several hundred miles and dwarfs ...

NASA sees brief life of Tropical Storm Olivia

Oct 09, 2012

Tropical Storm Olivia was a three-day tropical cyclone in the eastern Pacific Ocean. It was born on Oct. 6 and faded to a remnant low pressure system on Oct. 9. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of ...

Recommended for you

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

Apr 18, 2014

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

User comments : 0

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.