NASA signs agreement to develop nasal spray for motion sickness

October 15, 2012 by Rachel Kraft And William Jeffs

NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston and Epiomed Therapeutics Inc. of Irvine, Calif., have signed an agreement to develop and commercialize a NASA-crafted, fast-acting nasal spray to fight motion sickness.

Under the Space Act Agreement, Epiomed will formulate the drug, called intranasal scopolamine, or INSCOP. Astronauts often experience motion sickness in space. As a result, has conducted extensive research into the causes and treatments for the condition. Scopolamine is effective and can be administered as a tablet or injected. With a precise dosage, the NASA spray formulation has been shown to work faster and more reliably than the oral form.

"NASA and Epiomed will work closely together on further development of INSCOP to optimize therapeutic efficiency for both acute and chronic treatment of motion sickness which can be used by NASA, the Department of Defense and world travelers on land, in the air and on the seas," said Lakshmi Putcha, developer of the innovative at Johnson.

A gel formulation of INSCOP was developed and tested under a Space Act Agreement between Johnson and the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory in Pensacola, Fla. Results from that trial were published in the journal Aviation, Space and in April 2010 that suggest INSCOP is a fast-acting and reliable way to prevent and treat .

The U.S. Navy is working on an agreement with Epiomed to test the . NASA and Epiomed will collaborate on clinical trials related to the requirements. NASA is transferring sponsorship of future clinical trials and FDA approvals to Epiomed, which will supply the product for use by NASA and others.

For more about Johnson's Human Health and Performance Directorate, which developed INSCOP, visit: go.nasa.gov/RiKclM

Explore further: NASA Portable Hyperbaric Chamber Technology Finds Home on Earth

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