Nadine bringing tropical storm conditions back to the Azores

Oct 03, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nadine on Oct. 2 at 11:57 a.m. EDT and saw the strongest thunderstorms north and east of the center of circulation. Near-infrared data, which appears more like a visible image, still showed an eye-like feature. Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen

NASA satellites continue to gather data from Tropical Storm Nadine on its twenty-second day of life in the eastern Atlantic as it threatens the Azores again. NASA data has shown that wind shear is pushing the bulk of clouds and showers away from Nadine's center of circulation

A tropical storm warning is in effect for the Azores. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects tropical storm conditions associated with Nadine to spread over the northwestern Azores during the night hours on Wed. Oct. 3 and early Oct. 4.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over on Oct. 2 at 1517 UTC (11:57 a.m. EDT) and captured infrared and near- of the storm using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. AIRS data showed the strongest thunderstorms were located north and east of the center of circulation. Near-infrared data, which appears more like a visible image, still showed an eye-like feature in the storm's center, despite its tropical storm status.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
On Oct. 2 at 11:43 p.m. EDT, heavy convective thunderstorms were found in Nadine's northeastern quadrant by NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Wind shear had separated the center of circulation from this convective activity so, TRMM found virtually no rainfall near Nadine's center. TRMM's Precipitation Radar data reveal in this 3-D image that Nadine's vertical structure had changed significantly by wind shear since yesterday (Oct. 2, 2012). Powerful convective storms northeast of the center of circulation were still pushing to heights of about 12km (~7.5 miles). Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

On Oct. 3 at 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Nadine had near 50 mph (85 kmh). It was centered about 405 miles (650 km) west-southwest of the Azores near latitude 35.1 north and longitude 33.3 west. Nadine was moving to the east at 14 mph (22 kph), and had a minimum central pressure of 1000 millibars.

Some weakening is forecast during the next two days, but Nadine is expected to still be a tropical storm when the center moves near or over the Azores, according to the NHC.

Nadine is battling and cooler , two factors that will make the storm transition into an extra-tropical cyclone. Wind shear is so strong over Nadine that the strongest thunderstorms and rainfall are pushed northeast of the center. The NHC forecast calls for Nadine to most likely become a post-tropical cyclone by Oct. 5 or sooner, before it becomes absorbed by a large extra-tropical cyclone.

Explore further: Puget Sound quake likely in Seattle Fault zone, geologists say

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees wind shear battering Tropical Storm Nadine

Sep 13, 2012

Tropical Storm Nadine is struggling against wind shear and some dry air. Infrared satellite imagery from NASA showed that Nadine's most powerful thunderstorms were being pushed east of the center.

NASA sees Nadine weaken to a tropical storm again

Oct 01, 2012

NASA satellites continue to watch the long-lived Nadine in the eastern Atlantic. Today, Oct. 1, NASA satellite data revealed that Nadine has weakened from a hurricane and is now a tropical storm.

Recommended for you

Study links changing winds to warming in Pacific

Sep 22, 2014

A new study released Monday found that warming temperatures in Pacific Ocean waters off the coast of North America over the past century closely followed natural changes in the wind, not increases in greenhouse ...

User comments : 0