Slide left, slide right with Microsoft election site

October 27, 2012
US voters can slide their political orientation and news to the left, right or center with an elections website launched Friday by Microsoft search engine Bing.

US voters can slide their political orientation and news to the left, right or center with an elections website launched Friday by Microsoft search engine Bing.

The Bing Elections 2012 site was launched "to bring together comprehensive election news, up-to-the-minute election results, and social media insights—all in one place," Bing marketing chief Mike Nichols said in a blog post.

In one unique feature, users of the site will be able to click on a bar to shift the news orientation to the left or right.

For example, those choosing "right" can read a Washington Times article about waste in President 's green jobs program; those who opt for "left" can see a Salon.com view on Republican 's "economy hypocrisy."

Bing Elections has partnerships with Politico, RealClearPolitics, The Cook Political Report, Huffington Post and Associated Press for "real-time algorithmic news results."

It also has an interactive map with national, state and local election results and a "social" section with Twitter and comments and trends.

Explore further: Numbers Game: NC State Research Gives New Look to Election Statistics

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