Japanese company builds 9.6-inch 4K x 2K LCD panel

Oct 26, 2012 by Bob Yirka report
Japanese company builds 9.6 inch 4K x 2K LCD panel

(Phys.org)—Japanese firm Ortus Technology Co., Ltd. has revealed its development of what the company is calling the world's smallest LCD display panel that meets the 4K standard. At just 9.6 inches with a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels, the new display will be small enough for use in handheld devices.

The current high-definition standard for television, known as , is based on a 2K resolution and has saturated the market to the extent that new higher-resolution standards have been proposed. Currently, the leading contenders are 4K and 8K, both proposed by NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories as defined by the International Telecommunication Union. Thus far, devices built with such technology are still in the research and development phase. However, the 8K version has been approved by the UN's communication standards setting agency, which paved the way for NHK to showcase examples of broadcast television based on this technology at the recent summer Olympic Games.

More recently, Sony began selling an 84-inch television that adheres to the 4K standard. Larger television sets show the most improvements over HDTV when implementing the new standard, as more result in a sharper image when viewed from a distance. More pixels on a small screen, on the other hand, have been described as unnecessary due to the human eye's inability to discern the difference in size of the ultra-small pixels. In its announcement describing the new ultra-high-definition panel, Ortus says the focus will be on selling the new screen to developers who require high resolution in a small device, such as those used for video editing, medical equipment, or broadcasting monitors.

To build this small panel with such a large number of pixels, Ortus says it used special liquid crystal alignment technology based on the HAST [Hyper Amorphous Silicon TFT (Thin Film Transistor)] standard in its microfabrication process: a technology the company developed itself. In addition to its high resolution, the company says the panel has a 160 horizontal-and-vertical degree viewing angle.

The new panel is to be on display at the electronica 2012 trade fair being held in Munich next month.

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User comments : 11

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hb_
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 26, 2012
I like! Each pixel should be ~55 microns wide, so I expect the image to be pretty amazing!
TheKnowItAll
4.6 / 5 (5) Oct 26, 2012
I don't see the use of that much resolution on a small screen unless you plan on putting it under a microscope. lol but really they should improve on the color depth and the refresh rate for a while. Doubling the standard of both the 32bit depth and the 60Hz refresh rate would be what would attract me most.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (2) Oct 26, 2012
I don't see the use of that much resolution on a small screen unless you plan on putting it under a microscope.
I think there's competition between these LCD screen manufacturers and the people who package ChapStick to see who can display the smallest text on their product. So far, ChapStick is still winning.
Deathclock
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 26, 2012
I don't see the use of that much resolution on a small screen unless you plan on putting it under a microscope. lol but really they should improve on the color depth and the refresh rate for a while. Doubling the standard of both the 32bit depth and the 60Hz refresh rate would be what would attract me most.


You complain about the usefulness of the resolution WRT the human eye but you think anyone's eye can tell the difference between more than 16.7 million colors?

FYI, 32 bit color has 24 bits of color information and 8 bits for alpha (transparency) allowing for 256 steps of from fully transparent to fully opaque. 32 bit color is not used for television displays because transparency is not an issue, 24 bit color is the standard. Doubling this to 48 bit color (which is a real standard already) allows for 281,474,976,710,656 distinct color shades... FAR FAR beyond the ability for a human eye to resolve, and for most hardware to display accurately.
Eikka
4.5 / 5 (2) Oct 26, 2012
I don't see the use of that much resolution on a small screen unless you plan on putting it under a microscope.


It's around 450 DPI while the absolute maximum resolution that still makes a difference to normal vision on a handheld device would be around 600.

An average person's resolving power at 87 DPI-m at 1 feet distance with all the relevant factors (Nyquist/Kell) taken into account would be around 652 DPI. In other words, if you're holding this screen like a book, you don't exactly see the pixel grain or the jaggies but the image is still slightly blurrier than it could be.
Eikka
5 / 5 (2) Oct 26, 2012
You complain about the usefulness of the resolution WRT the human eye but you think anyone's eye can tell the difference between more than 16.7 million colors?


There are that many possible combinations of bits in the color data, but for any particular hue of color, you always have less than 256 different shades and most of the time you only have a handful because each color channel is only 8 bits deep. Furthermore, to do any color correction on such picture in the panel, such as gamma correction or color balance, will reduce the effective bitdepth due to rounding errors.

The result is banding artifacts.
TheKnowItAll
2 / 5 (1) Oct 26, 2012
Eikka thanks for the DPI info and your second comment was exacly my issue with the low 8bit/channel color depth and Deathclock I was talking about the wide spread standards. Look at that image and you'll understand what I was talking about. http://cinetal.co...blue.png There is no way to fix that other than by increasing the bit count. Now move that picture around on the screen at more than 120 pixel/second. ewwww lol.
ShotmanMaslo
5 / 5 (1) Oct 27, 2012
Another application of these displays is virtual reality HMDs such as Oculus Rift. When the display fills whole field of view of both eyes, even 4K resolution is well under human visual acuity.
DavidW
not rated yet Oct 27, 2012
I think there's competition between these LCD screen manufacturers and the people who package ChapStick to see who can display the smallest text on their product. So far, ChapStick is still winning.


Thanks for the laugh
alfie_null
not rated yet Oct 27, 2012
There is no way to fix that other than by increasing the bit count.

Actually, here's a couple ideas:

Match the sensitivity curves of our human eyes more closely in the n-bit space (6, 8, etc.) of rendering devices like flat screens. Logs would be expedient. Anything other than linear would be an improvement.

If you are stuck with linear hardware, in the rendering software, you could, in an area designated to be of a certain level, interpolate between adjacent levels. I imagine you could do this per primary, or get clever and do it in some color space.
Eikka
5 / 5 (2) Oct 27, 2012
Match the sensitivity curves of our human eyes more closely in the n-bit space (6, 8, etc.) of rendering devices like flat screens.


It is already done. The color values are rendered according to a gamma curve, and gamma correction, which account for non-linearities in the display device and in the human eye.