Infrared NASA imagery shows Nadine still has an eye, despite being a tropical storm

Oct 02, 2012
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Nadine was taken on Oct. 2, 2012, at 4:11 UTC (12:11 a.m. EDT) and the center of circulation (yellow) is still very visible, despite Nadine being below hurricane strength. Strongest thunderstorms (purple) surround the center. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Forecasters know that Tropical Storm Nadine is a fighter as it continues to stay alive in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Even satellite imagery shows Nadine's fighting spirit, because although Nadine is now a tropical storm, infrared data clearly shows that Nadine maintained an eye early on Oct. 2.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 2, Nadine remains a tropical storm and appears to be weakening. Nadine's were near 65 mph (100 kph). The center of was located near latitude 34.2 north and longitude 37.5 west. Nadine is moving toward the east-southeast near 7 mph (11 kph) and is expected to turn east then northeast on Wednesday, Oct. 3.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an on Oct. 2, 2012 at 4:11 UTC (12:11 a.m. EDT). Despite Nadine being a tropical storm the center of circulation was still very visible. Strongest thunderstorms appeared north and west of the center of circulation, where cloud-top temperatures were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

The National Hurricane Center expects Nadine's center will approach the central and northwestern Azores late on Oct. 3, Wednesday. Meanwhile south of Nadine System 96L appears to be ripe for development, and may become a tropical depression in the next two days. If the low pressure area strengthens and organizes further into a tropical storm, it would be named Oscar.

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