UN meet reviews steps to save global biodiversity

Oct 16, 2012

(AP)—Delegates from nearly 200 countries are working to implement an agreement for protecting Earth's ecosystems at a biodiversity conference in southern India.

The U.N. conference in Hyderabad is discussing progress toward achieving goals set in the and the Nagoya Protocol created in Japan two years ago.

The protocol lays down steps for countries to protect ecosystems and share access to . Convention officials told delegations that 92 countries have signed the protocol but only six have ratified it.

Scientists warn that numerous species could become extinct unless action is taken to protect them. However, countries are divided over resources to fund the Nagoya protocol.

Explore further: Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife

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