Environmentalist pioneer Barry Commoner dies at 95

Oct 02, 2012 by Deepti Hajela

(AP)—Barry Commoner, a scientist and a pioneer of the environmental movement, has died in New York at age 95.

His wife, Lisa Feiner, says he died Sunday afternoon at a Manhattan hospital where he had been since Friday.

Commoner was an outspoken advocate for environmental issues and was among those who raised concerns over the effects of .

He was one of the founders of a well-known survey of in St. Louis that started in the late 1950s and showed how children were absorbing fallout from nuclear bombs that were being tested.

The survey helped persuade government officials to partially ban some kinds of .

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ludwigpants
1 / 5 (3) Oct 02, 2012
Ohhh nooo, he was so young. Environmentalism has taken another life. When will we find a cure for this malformity?

Well, at least he overcame the psychological oppression of his fathers surname.

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