Climate scepticism highest in US, Britain

October 4, 2012
Demonstrators at the University of Denver before Wednesday's debate by Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Awareness of climate change is high in many countries, especially the tropics, but in Britain, Japan and the United States many are doubtful about the cause, a poll published on Thursday said.

Awareness of climate change is high in many countries, especially the tropics, but in Britain, Japan and the United States many are doubtful about the cause, a poll published on Thursday said.

A survey of 13,492 adults in 13 countries who were questioned by Internet found that 88 percent believed the climate had changed over the past 20 years.

The figures ranged from 98 percent in Mexico and Hong Kong and 97 percent in to 80 percent in Belgium and 72 percent in the United States.

Rising , drought and were the phenomena that people most cited.

On the question whether climate change had been scientifically proven, agreement was highest in Indonesia, Hong Kong and Turkey (95, 89 and 86 percent respectively).

It was lowest in Japan (58 percent), preceded by Britain (63 percent) and the United States (65 percent).

Asked whether human activity was mainly responsible for , 94 percent of citizens in Hong Kong agreed, followed by 93 percent in Indonesia, 92 percent in Mexico and 87 percent in Germany.

Dissent was strongest in the United States, where 58 percent agreed with the question, in Britain (65 percent) and Japan (78 percent).

The survey was carried out from July 5 to August 6 by the opinion poll group Ipsos for the insurance firm Axa.

It was conducted in Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey and the United States.

Explore further: BBC survey: Humans cause global warming

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VendicarD
2.3 / 5 (6) Oct 04, 2012
It isn't at all surprising that the two nations with the most rapid decline in their economies are also the ones with the dumbest populations.

Conservatives are cancer.
verkle
1.8 / 5 (5) Oct 04, 2012
no vendi you have it backwards. The #1 and #3 economic powers of the world are not the dumbest populations. Otherwise they wouldn't be in that positions.

There is a reason to their greatness.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (1) Oct 05, 2012
There is a reason to their greatness.

Biggest guns.

Schoolyard bullies are usually not the brightest tools in the shed (because they don't need to be).
Sigh
3.3 / 5 (3) Oct 05, 2012
Conservatives are cancer.

That is what Jonathan Haidt, a liberal with a more nuanced view because he has researched the issue, calls the myth of pure evil: the belief that those who disagree with you on anything with a moral dimension could only disagree if they are evil, and evil all the way through. It is one major contributor to the polarisation and resultant poor quality of debate.
italba
5 / 5 (1) Oct 05, 2012
There is a reason to their greatness.

Think about what are now some of the greatest economies of the past. Iraq, Egypt, Greece, Italy, Spain...

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