New Zealand court rejects global warming challenge

Sep 07, 2012
A carving of "Tawhirimatea", the Maori god of wind and weather. New Zealand's High Court on Friday dismissed a challenge launched by climate change sceptics against a government research agency's finding that the temperature had risen in the past century.

New Zealand's High Court on Friday dismissed a challenge launched by climate change sceptics against a government research agency's finding that the temperature had risen in the past century.

The court backed the science that led the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) to conclude that New Zealand's climate warmed almost one degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) between 1909 and 2009.

New Zealand Education Trust, a private body that rejects the argument that human activity has caused global warming, went to court alleging NIWA's methodology was flawed and its findings were not peer reviewed.

Judge Geoffrey Venning rejected the allegations in a written ruling handed down Friday, saying NIWA acted "in accordance with internationally recognised and credible scientific methodology".

"The plaintiff does not succeed on any of its challenges... the application for judicial review is dismissed and judgment entered for the defendant," he wrote.

Venning ordered the trust to pay NIWA's costs.

NIWA was not immediately available for comment but a group of six scientists from New Zealand tertiary institutions including Wellington's Victoria University and the University of Otago welcomed the decision.

"The basic science of climate change has been established for well over a century, and almost all scientists active in agree that human activity is causing the climate to change," they said in a statement.

"For a small group of scientists to appeal to a court of law to find otherwise is bizarre."

They said climate change had caused glaciers to retreat in New Zealand over the past century, as well as rising sea-levels globally and a reduction in .

"This misguided action of a small group adds confusion to a simple issue—the world is warming and of New Zealanders will have to deal with the consequences," they added.

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User comments : 1

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ekim
4 / 5 (4) Sep 07, 2012
Yes, the Earth travels around the sun.
Yes, the Earth is older than 6000 years.
Yes, the Earth is warming.
Too bad scientists must waste their time with such frivolous lawsuits. Skepticism is key to scientific progress, however it should be fueled by facts, not preconceived agendas based on dogma.

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