Toshiba plans rollout of entire-home battery system

Sep 17, 2012 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org)—Japan's residents well know the difficulties of power outages; unsurprisingly, efforts toward smarter solutions for backup power options are top priority for R&D at companies like Toshiba. The company plans to roll out a home storage battery system that can keep appliances running for a good part of the day. Toshiba Corp and Toshiba Lighting and Technology Corp have developed a storage battery system that makes use of the company's technology for rechargeable batteries. The system is called eneGoon, and it can do the work in the event of a power shortage to power up the gamut of frequently used household appliances Toshiba says eneGoon can powering a home dweller's refrigerator, TV, PC, and lights for 12 hours on a full charge.

More specifically, on a full charge, the Toshiba system is reportedly capable of powering lighting equipment (100W), refrigerator (160W), TV (150W) and personal computer (30W) for about 12 hours. Recharging takes about five hours. A rapid-charge mode cuts it down to two hours. The output power of the eneGoon is 3.0kVA, which Toshiba claims is the highest output power of a home-use electricity storage system in the industry The system's key component is Toshiba's "SCiB" lithium-ion rechargeable battery which has a capacity of 6.6kWh, considered relatively high for a home .

Since 2010, Toshiba has promoted its ability to put battery technology on the fast track with the SCiB, a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The company says its advantages include minimal capacity loss, a high level of safety, and long life of more than 6,000 charge-discharge cycles, along with high power output performance.

Toshiba Lighting and Technology will launch eneGoon in November in .

There was no information on pricing at the time of this writing. According to Tech-On, the eneGoon's maximum power output is 3.0kVA and it can appliances up to 200V. The product is going to appear in November in Japan but that does not deter outsiders from taking an interested look at what Toshiba has developed, at a time when better solutions for storage batteries that can cost less and do more, longer, are goals everywhere.

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Newbeak
not rated yet Sep 17, 2012
This would be a godsend for cold areas of the country-my gas furnace has to have power to run.I guess I could rig up something to just power the furnace,but running your other stuff would be great too.
dirk_bruere
1 / 5 (3) Sep 17, 2012
The home solar energy package will soon be complete and enable people in much of the world to permanently live off grid. This in turn will set a ceiling on what traditional energy companies can charge their domestic clients.
Newbeak
3 / 5 (2) Sep 17, 2012
Yes,but the upfront costs for a solar cell system that can get you off the grid are enormous.There are companies in California that lease the collectors-that might make it feasible for homeowners to generate their own juice.What about people who live in northern climates,say Minnesota or North Dakota? There aren't enough rays in the winter to power a house.
ormondotvos
3 / 5 (1) Sep 17, 2012
A marine deep cycle battery is about a Kwh. Six of them is about $600. Three kilowatt level inverter-chargers is another $600. Weight doesn't matter for a house, just $/kwh. There's also the concept of using the car to charge the battery set. Or you could use a natural gas powered Honda eu3000 with autostart. duh.
baudrunner
1 / 5 (1) Sep 17, 2012
Each battery should be just that, a battery, one half for one twelve-hour cycle and the other for the other 12-hour cycle. All that hydro does is charge the battery. But, why..? Doesn't it cost the same?
Newbeak
1 / 5 (1) Sep 17, 2012
A marine deep cycle battery is about a Kwh. Six of them is about $600. Three kilowatt level inverter-chargers is another $600. Weight doesn't matter for a house, just $/kwh. There's also the concept of using the car to charge the battery set. Or you could use a natural gas powered Honda eu3000 with autostart. duh.


Do affordable solar cells have the ability to fully charge your batteries and still power your house in daytime? I think not,especially in North Dakota in January.
jerryd
not rated yet Sep 17, 2012

ormondo is correct lead is by far the lower cost and we have been doing such systems forever called UPS!!

Only a fool would pay 5-10x's as much for Li batts.

PV is now at $1k/kw and 1.2kw of them would charge this battery every day to 7kw. Another 2kw of PV to use and/or sell peak power or use to charge a lightweight EV which battery pack could be used by the home like I did with my EV's during our hurricane problems in Fl a while back.

I don't buy any Toshiba products since they sold out the west to the USSR for just $1m of software which allowed them to make much quieter and if they hadn't colasped, would have cost the US billions to defeat!!!
dschlink
3.3 / 5 (3) Sep 18, 2012
PV wouldn't work in most of the USA, most of the time. I have an acquaintance that has a 2.8kW system. He has averaged ONE kW-hr per installed watt per year (2700 kW-hr for the year). That's 14 cents saved for $400/yr total. That's for a $27K (total installed cost) system.

85% is generated in June, July and August. A typical winter day, he gets less than one kW-hr total. Fortunately, he is wealthy and can waste money on PV just for fun.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Sep 18, 2012
Yes,but the upfront costs for a solar cell system that can get you off the grid are enormous.

There's really a mix of factors whether it's worth it.
As with all items with a significant price tag there are alternatives to shelling out all the dough up front.
Prices for fossil fuels are going nowhere but up.
Changing to a form of heating that is dependent on an energy source that is (potentially, with alternative powerplants) stable to becoming ever cheaper as efficiencies in home appliances and harvesting energy rise. So for such an investment you have to look at current AND future costs of your power/heating needs.

For places with unreliable power sources that's certainly also another big draw. And vertainly with widespread use these systems would be awesome for stabilizing a grid fed exclusively by solar wave and wind energy.
rubberman
not rated yet Sep 19, 2012
ormondo is correct lead is by far the lower cost and we have been doing such systems forever called UPS!!

Only a fool would pay 5-10x's as much for Li batts.

From the article - "The company says its advantages include minimal capacity loss, a high level of safety, and long life of more than 6,000 charge-discharge cycles, along with high power output performance."

The type of lead acid batteries in a UPS cannot come close to a cycle of 6000 charge/discharge. They also lose their ability to hold a charge over a 5 year period, whether they are used or not. They are cheaper for sure, and could work....but not this well.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Sep 19, 2012
Additionally this is (first and foremost) for the Japanese market. In many cities there space is at a premium (apartments and shops are tiny). Lithium batteries have 10 to 20 times the power density of lead-acid batteries and are consequently much more compact.
Hideko
not rated yet Sep 19, 2012
BTW - the article states that this uses 'lithium-ion' batteries but it is my understanding that these actually use the SCiB (Super-Charge Ion Battery) which are 'Lithium-Titanate' - which I believe are safer & faster charging.

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