Sounds of space: New 'chorus' recording by RBSP's EMFISIS instrument

September 14, 2012
Illustration of RBSP spacecraft with instruments labeled. Credit: LMSAL

(Phys.org)—Researchers from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) team at the University of Iowa have released a new recording of an intriguing and well-known phenomenon known as "chorus," made on Sept. 5, 2012. The Waves tri-axial search coil magnetometer and receiver of EMFISIS captured several notable peak radio wave events in the magnetosphere that surrounds the Earth. The radio waves, which are at frequencies that are audible to the human ear, are emitted by the energetic particles in the Earth's magnetosphere.

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Audio of the phenomenon known as "chorus" radio waves within Earth’s magnetosphere that are audible to the human ear, as recorded on Sept. 5, 2012, by RBSP’s Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS). Five six-second "events" are captured in this sample, and they are played end-to-end, one right after the other, without gaps. Credit: University of Iowa

"People have known about chorus for decades," says EMFISIS principal investigator Craig Kletzing, of the University of Iowa. "Radio receivers are used to pick it up, and it sounds a lot like birds chirping. It was often more easily picked up in the mornings, which along with the chirping sound is why it's sometimes referred to as 'dawn chorus.'"

This recording was made by many members of the EMFISIS team, including Terry Averkamp, Dan Crawford, Larry Granroth, George Hospodarsky, Bill Kurth, Jerry Needell and Chris Piker.

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SleepTech
5 / 5 (1) Sep 14, 2012
My cat's eyes got all huge, ran and jumped up to the top of my cupboard. Anybody else have pets with similar reactions while playing this audio?
Sonhouse
5 / 5 (1) Sep 14, 2012
Hell, I jumped up too:)
cantdrive85
2 / 5 (8) Sep 14, 2012
Here are a couple articles that discuss how the electric currents flowing through the magnetosphere create this radio noise.

http://www.thunde...oisy.htm
http://www.thunde...apter-8/
ECOnservative
1 / 5 (3) Sep 14, 2012
My old hound dog got up and slunk out of the room, giving me a dirty backward glance as she left.
Deathclock
3 / 5 (6) Sep 14, 2012
Here are a couple articles that discuss how the electric currents flowing through the magnetosphere create this radio noise.

http://www.thunde...oisy.htm


That's a nice crank wordpress website you keep linking to in multiple discussions... you are here to do nothing but push an agenda, and this is immediately apparent to anyone paying attention.

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