Russian rocket sends European weather satellite into orbit

Sep 17, 2012
Europe's latest weather satellite Metop-B is pictured sealed in a Soyuz rocket mounted on a launch pad at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on September 14.

The European meteorological satellite Metop-B was put into orbit Monday by a Russian Soyuz rocket launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the space agency Roskosmos said.

The entry into orbit took place "as planned" at 1737 GMT, a spokesman told AFP.

The 4100-kilogram (4.1-tonne) satellite is expected to remain in a polar orbit for five years.

The Metop-B weather satellite was developed and built by Astrium, the top European company in the space industry.

From its polar orbit at 817 kilometres (508 miles) from Earth, the satellite will provide different measures that are essential to meteorological forecasts and the monitoring of the planet's climate, according to Astrium.

Metop-B is the second in a series of three weather satellites that the (ESA) along with the European Organisation for Meteorological Satellite Exploration (EUMETSAT) has ordered from Astrium.

The satellites have been launched at five to six year intervals, with the first Metop-A going into space in 2006. The third Metop-C satellite is scheduled for orbit in 2017. The series is intended to provide continuity in furnishing information until the arrival of a new generation of satellites.

Explore further: Amazing raw Cassini images from this week

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ESA sets MetOp-A launch date

Sep 14, 2006

The European Space Agency says the launch of MetOp-A, the first in a new European series of three meteorological satellites, will be Oct. 7.

MetOp to be launched in October

Aug 07, 2006

MetOp, the first in the new European series of operational meteorological satellites in polar orbit, is now scheduled for launch on 7 October 2006. The new date was established last week following various planning ...

Last look at weather satellite

Sep 12, 2012

(Phys.org)—As preparations for the launch of Europe's latest weather satellite continue on track, the team in Kazakhstan has said farewell to MetOp-B as it was sealed in the Soyuz rocket fairing. Liftoff ...

MetOp satellite shipped to Baikonur on 18 April

Apr 19, 2006

The first MetOp meteorological satellite arrived yesterday at its launch site, the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, following shipment from the industrial prime contractor, EADS Astrium in Toulouse, on board ...

Europe's next weather satellite gears up for launch

Mar 20, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Following the safe arrival of the MetOp-B weather satellite in Kazakhstan, the sophisticated craft is now being carefully assembled and tested before launch on 23 May. MetOp-B will provide ...

Recommended for you

Amazing raw Cassini images from this week

4 hours ago

When Saturn is at its closest to Earth, it's three-quarters of a billion miles away—or more than a billion kilometers! That makes these raw images from the ringed planet all the more remarkable.

Europe launches two navigation satellites

4 hours ago

Two satellites for Europe's rival to GPS were lifted into space on Friday to boost the Galileo constellation to six orbiters of a final 30, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.

SpaceX gets 10-year tax exemption for Texas site

5 hours ago

Cameron County commissioners have agreed to waive 10 years of county taxes as part of an agreement bringing the world's first commercial site for orbital rocket launches to the southernmost tip of Texas.

Voyager map details Neptune's strange moon Triton

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first close-up look at Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. Like an old film, Voyager's historic footage of Triton has been "restored" ...

How the sun caused an aurora this week

8 hours ago

On the evening of Aug. 20, 2014, the International Space Station was flying past North America when it flew over the dazzling, green blue lights of an aurora. On board, astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this ...

User comments : 0