For the rooster, size matters—Pleiotropic genes affect comb size and egg production

Sep 04, 2012
Three eighth generation advanced intercross siblings, demonstrating the extreme variation present in a cross between red jungle fowl and domestic chicken. LiU researchers have in this study discovered two 'pleiotropic' genes that influence both comb size and bone mass, and thereby also egg production. Credit: Dominic Wright

A lone rooster sees a lot of all the hens in the flock, but the hen with the largest comb gets a bigger dose of sperm - and thus more chicks. This sounds natural, but behind all this is humanity's hunger for eggs.

For thousands of years, people have tinkered with the development of domestic chickens. Through for a few characteristics such as large and increased egg-laying, we have at the same time caused numerous other radical changes in appearance and behaviour. A research group at Linköping University in Sweden has now shown how the size of a hen's comb is bound up with the ability to lay more eggs. The results have been presented in the scientific journal .

Compared with the original wild jungle hen, domestic hens have larger combs as well as denser bones. This influences egg-laying, as the hen's bone tissues provide calcium for the eggshells. The greater the , the more eggs she can lay.

After having spotted a clear correlation between comb size and bone mass in chickens from a cross between red junglefowl and , the research group – under the leadership of evolutionary Dominic Wright – set up a study where such chickens were crossed for several generations. In this way the genome was split up into smaller and smaller regions, which allowed the "mapping" of the functions of individual genes.

In the eighth generation, the researchers found an area that had a strong effect on the weight of the comb – but also on bone mass and fertility.

The has gradually decreased over the course of . In domestic chickens there are now some 40 known small regions with stable genes that potentially govern their typical "domestic" characteristics. LiU researchers have now discovered two "pleiotropic" genes: two genes connected to each other that influence several characteristics simultaneously. By regulating the production of cartilage, they influence combs (which consist of cartilage throughout) as well as bone growth (where cartilage is the base material) and, ultimately, egg production.

"The original hens have smaller combs, thinner legs, and lay fewer eggs. When people bred for the characteristic of laying many eggs, the comb grew automatically," Dominic Wright says.

In nature, the comb is an example of a sexual ornament. Individuals – often males – with the most impressive ornaments are favoured by females, thereby obtaining more numerous offspring than their competitors. In domesticated animals, sexual selection – like natural selection – has lost its role, as it was humans who determine breeding.

Explore further: Study pumps up the volume on understanding of marine invertebrate hearing

More information: A sexual ornament in chickens is affected by pleiotropic alleles at HA01 and BMP2, selected during domestication by M Johnsson, I Gustafson, C-J Rubin, A-S Sahlqvist, K B Jonsson, S Kerje, O Ekwall, O Kämpe, L Andersson, P Jensen and D Wright. PLoS Genetics 8(8) August 30, 2012.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Omega acids could reduce bone breakage in laying hens

Apr 05, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A study has found that adding the right combination of fatty acids to the diets of laying hens can significantly reduce bone breakage during lay. The research could provide a potentially significant route ...

Less feather pecking with bitter spray

Oct 29, 2010

Feather pecking among chickens can be reduced by half if their feathers are sprayed with a bitter substance. Unfortunately, pecking cannot be corrected, says Bas Rodenburg of the Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre of Wageningen ...

Recommended for you

Ninety-eight new beetle species discovered in Indonesia

14 hours ago

Ninety-eight new species of the beetle genus Trigonopterus have been described from Java, Bali and other Indonesian islands. Museum scientists from Germany and their local counterparts used an innovative approa ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.