Robben Island penguins hit by fuel from wrecked tanker

Sep 02, 2012
Penguins are pictured in Simon's Town near Cape Town, South Africa, in 2011. Fuel leaking from a Turkish freighter wreck that has been smashed up by a storm has contaminated at least five penguins on South Africa's Robben Island, emergency services said Sunday.

Fuel leaking from a Turkish freighter wreck that has been smashed up by a storm has contaminated at least five penguins on South Africa's Robben Island, emergency services said Sunday.

One penguin from the island had been rescued for treatment and cleaning and a team would also capture the others, they added.

"At this stage it is not clear how seriously the birds are oiled, however will assess the birds and determine where they should be released," said a statement from the service.

The fuel escaped from the wreck of the "Seli 1" freighter, which went down in September 2009 and the discharge has already polluted two nearby beaches. It began leaking the fuel after a weekend storm smashed what was left of the vessel into three pieces.

A trail of fuel eight nautical miles (15 kilometres) in length and three metres wide extended from the vessel between Cape Town Harbour and Robben Island, the statement said.

The area was expected to be cleaned up Monday, the having prevented any earlier intervention.

South Africa's transport ministry requested the release of 40 million rand (3.8 million euro, $4.8 million) to remove the wreck, said.

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User comments : 3

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Jeweller
1 / 5 (1) Sep 02, 2012
This is the third time oil has spilled from that Shipwreck. As far as I know, the owners of the Ship refused to take any responsibility for clean up operations which cost The City of Cape Town a lot of money. What do they care. Residents of Cape Town, such as myself, just have to pay and pay.
verkle
1 / 5 (4) Sep 02, 2012
The most worthless article I have read in a while. Is there really nothing more important to report on instead?

Jeweller
1 / 5 (1) Sep 02, 2012
News Just In !
Someone just drove over three dung beetles in The Kruger National Park. Three seconds of mourning have been declared throughout South Africa.

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