Retailers to add radical 'focus later' camera

Sep 25, 2012
Image courtesy of Lytro, Inc. shows Lytro cameras. A radical camera that lets users adjust the focus after taking pictures will be available in October at shops in Australia, Canada, Singapore, Hong Kong and the United States.

A radical camera that lets users adjust the focus after taking pictures will be available in October at shops in Australia, Canada, Singapore, Hong Kong and the United States.

The move announced on Tuesday marked an expansion for the Lytro, which began shipping in March but has been available only by order on the Internet.

"Since introducing the Lytro camera just six months ago, nearly 400,000 light field pictures have been shared on Lytro.com," said Lytro chief executive Charles Chi.

"We are excited to take this picture revolution one step further by making Lytro available to more photographers in the US and around the world."

The Lytro is the creation of Ren Ng, who started work on the digital camera while studying for a doctorate in at Stanford University in California.

The telescope-shaped camera uses what is known as "light field technology" to allow the of a to be changed after the picture is taken, a feature that Lytro calls "shoot now, focus later."

Clicking on a Lytro picture displayed on a allows a viewer to shift the focus from a subject in the foreground, for example, to a subject in the background.

The Lytro can do this because it uses powerful to capture significantly more light than a conventional camera.

Lytro executive chairman Ng, who was born in Malaysia and raised in Australia, describes the images as "living pictures" because of the ability to manipulate them.

When Lytro pictures are shared online, the "light field engine" travels with each image so anyone can change focal points as desired.

The 16- model of the camera, which is about the same size as a stick of butter and can fit easily in a pocket, costs $499 and can hold 750 pictures. An 8GB version costs $399 and can capture 350 images.

Lytro said that expanding availability of the cameras come as demand increases for the technology around the world.

" are asking for the Lytro camera and we're excited to bring it to them," said Dan Miall of Blonde Robot, with is distributing the cameras in that country.

"There has been a lot of excitement to be a part of this next phase in photography and start producing light field pictures in Australia."

Explore further: Selfie sticks could bring jail time in South Korea

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Start up creates a 'no-focus' point and shoot camera

Jun 22, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- If you have ever used a "Point and Shoot" style of camera in the last few years then you know that that term is a misnomer because unless you are using a disposable camera you are going to ...

3-D, after-the-fact focus image sensors invented

Apr 03, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- At the heart of digital photography is a chip called an image sensor that captures a map of the intensity of the light as it comes through the lens and converts it to an electronic signal.

Nikon DSLRs can give eye-opening results

Feb 27, 2009

I am no camera buff. I bought my first digital camera only three years ago, and I often prefer to use the 2-megapixel camera in my iPhone than carry around another gadget.

Recommended for you

GoGlove wearable aims to control life's soundtracks

Nov 26, 2014

Technology creatives are seeing the key attraction in wearables as being in solutions that save the user from fumbling around with the phone to make app adjustments or changes, or from repeatedly taking it ...

Amazon cuts Fire phone price to ignite sales

Nov 26, 2014

Amazon on Wednesday slashed the price of Fire mobile phones that stalled after launch early this year, becoming a drag on the US online retail titan's bottom line.

Tech review: Another year, another iPad

Nov 25, 2014

Some years, Apple introduces a new version of a product and the world rejoices. Other years, the updates are more under the hood, but they still sell a ton.

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

jscroft
4.2 / 5 (5) Sep 25, 2012
That is wicked cool.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Sep 25, 2012
Will it still require and Apple computer to process images?
kochevnik
3 / 5 (2) Sep 25, 2012
Will it still require and Apple computer to process images?
No, but you will have to yank the passkey out of Job's cold, dead hand every time you want to refocus grandma.
gmurphy
not rated yet Sep 26, 2012
This could have considerable benefits for robotic vision, allowing saccade shifts without having to move the camera.
kochevnik
4 / 5 (1) Sep 26, 2012
This could have considerable benefits for robotic vision, allowing saccade shifts without having to move the camera.
If I'm not mistaken saccades are a requirement for mammalian retinas as cells only respond to changes in light, not light itself. I'm not aware that's a property of most cameras.
gmurphy
not rated yet Sep 30, 2012
@kochevnik, not so much the saccade but the act of refocusing ones visual perception, to be able to do this non-mechanically is a significant advantage, given the latency of electric motors, etc

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.