Panasonic HIT photovoltaic cells demonstrate high PID resistance

Sep 19, 2012

Panasonic Corporation today announced that its HIT photovoltaic module's high-level of resistance to potential induced degradation (PID) has been verified by the results of tests conducted within and outside the company. The test conditions set by the third party organization were very stringent among those applied for various PID tests reported by several organizations. The successful passing of such a severe endurance test has confirmed the high quality and high reliability of Panasonic HIT modules.

PID is a phenomenon in which power output of photovoltaic modules is reduced when they are subjected to external factors such as high temperature and humidity, under the condition that a high voltage is applied across the internal circuits () and the grounded frame. PID can occur in high-temperature and high-humidity environments, where the system voltage is high.

The following facts and the verification results obtained both within and outside the company demonstrate that the HIT photovoltaic cells are extremely resistant to PID.

  • With respect to conventional -based photovoltaic cells, the fact that the insulating layer on a cell surface takes charge is thought to be a direct cause of PID. However, in the case of HIT photovoltaic cells, both surfaces are transparent conductive layers with no insulating layers used. Therefore, no PID is thought to occur.
  • No incidences of PID have been reported from the European, U.S., or Japanese markets.
  • Two or more models of HIT photovoltaic modules were tested within and outside the company under multiple sets of conditions. The results showed no degradation in their characteristics.
  • During one of the third-party tests carried out by Chemitox Inc., HIT modules were subjected to 1,000 volts for 96 hours at a temperature of 60 degrees Celsius with 85% . Panasonic HIT exhibited no sign of degradation under such conditions, which are extremely stringent compared to other third-party tests whose results are publicly available.
  • Panasonic intends to accelerate development and commercialization of photovoltaic cells with high quality and high reliability and to work on expanding the business globally.

Explore further: Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Genetic test improves artificial fertilization

Mar 27, 2008

Polar body diagnosis can make artificial fertilization more successful, according to Katrin and Hans van der Ven and Markus Montag of Bonn University Clinic, writing in the current edition of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International ...

Anti-aging elixir for solar cells

Jul 03, 2012

Photovoltaic modules deliver power without risks to the environment and climate. But solar-power is expensive. Therefore, it is imperative that the modules last as long as possible, 25 years or more. Fraunhofer ...

Recommended for you

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

3 hours ago

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Bloomberg invests $5M in solar-powered lamp

16 hours ago

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's foundation has announced a $5 million investment in an artsy-looking solar-powered lamp designed for use in off-grid populations in Africa.

Tesla delivers first China cars, plans expansion

22 hours ago

Tesla Motors Inc. delivered its first eight electric sedans to customers in China on Tuesday and CEO Elon Musk said the company will build a nationwide network of charging stations and service centers as ...

Communities can drive urgent switch to clean energy

23 hours ago

Australia will continue to lag behind countries like the United States and Germany in heeding the UN's latest call to urgently switch to clean sources of energy unless the burgeoning community energy sector ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...