NASA sees sun unleash a wide, but benign, CME

Sep 28, 2012
NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory captured this image of a particularly wide coronal mass ejection (CME) that erupted from the sun at 10:23 p.m. EDT on Sep. 27, 2012. The leading edge of the CME appears to wrap around over half of the entire sun as it moves out into space. Credit: Credit: SOHO/ESA & NASA

The sun erupted with a wide, Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME) on Sept. 27, 2012 at 10:25 p.m. EDT. CMEs are a phenomenon that can send billions of tons of solar particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later, affecting electronic systems in satellites and on the ground. Experimental NASA research models estimate that the CME is traveling at around 700 miles per second and will reach Earth on Sept. 29.

CMEs of these speeds are usually benign. In the past, similar CMEs have caused auroras near the poles but have not caused disruption to electrical systems or significantly interfered with GPS or satellite-based communications systems.

The CME is associated with a fairly small that was measured as C-class, which is third in strength after X- and M-class flares. The flare peaked at 7 p.m. EDT and came from an active region on the sun labeled AR 1577.

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cantdrive85
1 / 5 (3) Sep 28, 2012
Expect to see an increase in earthquake, volcanic, aural, and severe weather activity in about two days.
Caliban
not rated yet Sep 28, 2012
Expect to see additional Auroral activity, possibly at lower than usual latitudes.

Too bad physorg didn't see fit to specify a time EDT for the expected arrival of the leading edge of the CME.

Rough calculation at 36.5 hours, using average distance of one AU=92M miles. So this CME will begin arriving at about noon, EDT, tomorrow(9/29) --more or less. Maybe see it in the skies of the nightside of earth.

We will await reports of greater-than-normal seismic/volcanic activity, along with reports of severe weather events that weren't already in progress.

This will be an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis and see if the Universe is as Electric as predicted.

My money is on no-show of any appreciable effects beyond possibly increased Auroral activity.

We'll leave the window for cantdrive85's other effects open for three days after noon EDT tomorrow, so anything that happens between then and roughly noon EDT 10/2 will be attributable to EU plasma effects.

That should do it.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (2) Sep 30, 2012
7.3 earthquake in Columbia, morning of Sunday, Sept 30th. Jelawat increased to cat 5 typhoon.