NASA to honor astronaut Armstrong September 13

Sep 05, 2012

A memorial service for Neil Armstrong, the US astronaut who became the first human being to set foot on the moon, will be held in the US capital Washington on September 13, NASA said Tuesday.

Charles Bolden, present and former astronauts and other dignitaries are expected to attend the ceremony at the Washington National Cathedral in honor of Armstrong, who died on August 25 at the age of 82.

Armstrong strode into the history books on July 20, 1969 when he became the first person to walk on the moon, famously calling it "one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind."

The Washington cathedral includes the famous stained glass Space Window, housing a moon rock brought back by Armstrong and fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin from their .

The service next week is scheduled to begin at 10:00 am (1400 GMT).

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