Italian architect designs world's biggest vertical garden

Sep 18, 2012
The world's largest vertical garden on a shopping mall facade in the town of Rozzano, near Milan, on September 18. It covers a surface of 1,263 square metres (13,600 square feet) with a total of 44,000 plants.

A shopping centre near Milan is claiming an unusual record—the biggest vertical garden in the world, covering a surface of 1,263 square metres (13,600 square feet) with a total of 44,000 plants.

The huge garden, which was inaugurated in 2010 but was only certified as a record this week, was designed by architect Francesco Bollani who headed up a creative team that included an architecture studio from Montpellier in France.

"It took us a year to grow the plants in a greenhouse and 90 days to build the facade," Bollani told AFP. "It was like building a giant Lego!"

The previous record was held by a Madrid garden covering 844 square metres.

A gardener takes care of the world's largest vertical garden on a shopping mall facade in the town of Rozzano, near Milan on September 18. The huge garden, which was inaugurated in 2010 but was only certified as a record this week, was designed by architect Francesco Bollani who headed up a creative team that included an architecture studio from Montpellier in France.

director Simone Rao said: "This is , which can combine beauty with while respecting the environment."

The garden helps regulate the temperature in the shopping centre in Rozzano and, by reducing direct sunlight, it helps keep low.

It also absorbs and reduces ambient noise to a minimum.

French architect Le Corbusier was one of the first to conceive of a vertical garden in 1923 and the idea has become very popular in architecture circles.

Bollani said that his version was easier to build and take apart because the garden is made up of small metallic containers.

This means the garden is more expensive than classical methods, with a total cost of 1.0 million euros ($1.3 million), he said.

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KalinForScience
1 / 5 (1) Sep 19, 2012
yes, it is exciting.., but is not biology science news.. we learnt nothing about nature's doings..

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