Research points the way to an Internet more resilient to attacks

Sep 26, 2012

It's startling to ponder the numerous ways our society relies almost completely upon on the Internet to conduct the business of everyday life. Commerce, communication and even national security all require a functioning World Wide Web.

"We really depend on the Internet for absolutely everything we do," said James Sterbenz, associate professor of and computer science at the University of Kansas. "Governments depend on it to deliver services, and the military depends on it, and businesses depend on it for commerce and the . We depend on it as individuals to get information, and to do banking, and to buy things—so much so that when the Internet is down, things tend to cease. You go into a store, and the point-of-sales terminals don't work, and they can't even sell you anything."

But without adequate research and preparation, threats such as or terrorist attacks could bring the Internet crashing down with grievous consequences. That's why Sterbenz is leading a $1.5 million effort funded by the National Science Foundation and Battelle to design a that will be much more resilient than it is today.

"There are a lot of weak points," said Sterbenz. "An example of that is that there was a train that burned in a tunnel under Baltimore a few years ago. It melted all the fiber running through the conduit. And because that was a convenient place way to get through the city, many service providers ran their fiber through. So people did lose service because of that because it was a weak point."

The KU researcher said that an who has probed the network to discover such weak points likewise could do considerable damage, not only to the of the Internet, but also to the "protocol infrastructure," such as the that translates human-friendly identifiers like www.ku.edu to and the Internet's core , the Border Gateway Protocol.

"These are very critical to the operation of the Internet," Sterbenz said. "And those do have some vulnerabilities. Attacks against those protocols specifically can have pretty significant impact. People can't get to websites, and communication can't occur."

To advance the robustness of the Internet, Sterbenz leads a team of researchers who are analyzing the complex networks of computers and fiber that constitute the Internet and World Wide Web.

"We look at that structure and analyze it to determine mathematically how robust it is against part of it being taken away," he said. "When we do that, we can see how current networks as well as proposed networks and structures we add will make it more resilient."

Redundancy and geographic diversity are keys to a hardier network, according to Sterbenz.

"You want at least two paths between two users, so if one is taken out, you have another one," said Sterbenz. "The other thing we want is geographic diversity. So you'd like to be able to set up multiple paths between two users such that no point is closer than, for example, 100 miles, so if there's some area-based challenge, you're still able to communicate."

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More information: wiki.ittc.ku.edu/resilinets

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Argiod
1 / 5 (2) Sep 27, 2012
Technically, we can live without it; we managed for millions of years before modern technology came along. It just wouldn't be as easy, convenient or entertaining without the Internet; but, certainly not fatal.

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