Humpback whales rebounding on Brazil's coast

September 2, 2012

(AP)—An institute that tracks the population of Humpback whales that reproduce along Brazil's coast says the number of the once-threatened mammals has tripled over the last 10 years.

The Institute says in a news release there are now almost 10,000 humpbacks off the Brazilian coast. In 2002, the institute counted approximately 3,000 whales.

Institute chief Milton Marcondes says the whales' fat once was used as fuel for public lighting and in construction. Hunting was banned in 1966, when only about 1,000 whales were left.

Marcondes says restoration efforts have helped the species recover in spite of global warming, accidents with boats and .

Explore further: Humpback whale migration as straight as an arrow

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Telekinetic
1 / 5 (1) Sep 03, 2012
This is great news- now all the Japanese have to do is stop whaling and we'll all be in the 21st century.

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