Greek tourist island rules out volcano fears

Sep 11, 2012
Sunset at the island of Santorini in May 2012. The Greek tourist island of Santorini on Tuesday said fears of a volcanic eruption after a magma buildup recorded by scientists last year were unfounded as geological activity had returned to normal.

The Greek tourist island of Santorini on Tuesday said fears of a volcanic eruption after a magma buildup recorded by scientists last year were unfounded as geological activity had returned to normal.

"The phenomenon of magma flux took part mainly between January 2011 and April 2012," the local council said in a statement.

"Since then, intense micro- accompanying the magma flux is in full decline," the council said.

"Any concern regarding the behaviour of the is unfounded," the statement said, adding that teams of scientists were constantly monitoring its activity.

The local council was reacting to a publication in Nature Geoscience journal earlier this week which said that a balloon of magma had built up under the island, raising its surface by 8-14 centimetres (3-5.5 inches).

"This volume is equivalent to 10-15 percent of the volumes of recorded dome-forming eruptions," the journal said.

Santorini, renowned for its beautiful sunsets and picturesque villages perched on rocky outcrops, is one of Greece's most popular travel destinations.

The island was completely reshaped by a in the late 17th century that wiped out a culturally advanced Minoan colony, and geothermal activity accompanied by seismic tremors remains high to this day.

The last of the most active part of the volcano, beneath the uninhabited black lava islet of Kameni near Santorini, occurred in 1950.

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rc_yvr
not rated yet Sep 11, 2012
One hadn't realized that the Bronze-age Minoan civilization was around "in the late 17th Century"...imagine that! What's 3,400 years give or take?

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