Curiosity snaps evocative self portrait

Sep 10, 2012 by Ken Kremer, Universe Today
Curiosity takes Self Portrait on Sol 32 with the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI). Image has been rotated up and enhanced by JPL. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems

Curiosity has snapped an evocative new color self-portrait – and it's totally unique, being the 1st head shot pose, showing the top of the Remote Sensing Mast (RSM).

You'll notice it's a bit dusty ! That's because it was acquired through the transparent dust cover protecting the high resolution Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera positioned on the turret at the end of Curiosity's 7 foot (2.1 meter) long robotic arm.

The gorgeous new image was taken on Sol 32 (Sept. 7, 2012) with the closed over the and thus provides a taste of even more spectacular views yet to come. The picture beautifully shows the Mastcam, Chemcam and Navcam cameras with the rim of Gale Crater in the background.

The MAHLI image above has been enhanced and rotated – to right side up. See the MAHLI raw image below.

The image was taken as JPL engineers were inspecting and moving the arm turret holding MAHLI and the other and tools and looking back to image them in turn using the Mast's cameras.

's mega Martian rover is pausing for about a week or two at this location reached after driving on Sol 29 (Sept. 2) and will thoroughly check out the and several science instruments.

So far has driven about 358 feet (109 meters) and is sitting roughly 270 feet from the "Bradbury Landing" touchdown spot as the Martian crow flies.

The car sized robot is about a quarter of the way to Glenelg, the destination of her first lengthy science stop where three different types of geologic terrain intersect and are easily accessible for a detailed science survey using all 10 state of the art instruments including the rock drill and soil sampling mechanisms.

Explore further: Earth's orbit around the sun

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Infominister
not rated yet Sep 10, 2012
Can anyone tell me whether the photo of Curiosity that appeared on the cover of TIME Magazine a few weeks ago was an actual photo, or was it a computer/graphic creation? If it was an actual photo, how was it taken? I heard something about a landing parachute.

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