Cost-efficient method developed for maximizing benefits from wine waste

Sep 25, 2012

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), shows that grape skin and seeds generated from winemaking—known as wine pomace—are a good source of antioxidant dietary fiber and can be used to fortify various food products such as yogurts and salad dressings with enhanced nutritional value and extended shelf-life.

The researchers from Oregon State University analyzed pomace from Pinot Noir and Merlot wines to determine the most economically feasible ways to convert the rich source of antioxidants in pomace into compounds that can be used to fortify foods.

Drying pomace in the oven at 104 degrees Fahrenheit and air drying at 77 degrees Fahrenheit were considered highly acceptable and much less costly compared with freeze drying. These methods can easily be converted into large scale industrial applications for food processing purposes.

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