Colleges try new fixes to recurring remedial rut

Sep 28, 2012 by Alan Scher Zagier

(AP)—At the nation's community colleges, more than half of students are forced to take classes in basic math and English, skills that they should have learned years ago.

The rate is even higher at Missouri State University's two-year campus in West Plains, where three out of every four students take at least one remedial class.

Like their counterparts at public flagship universities, rural teacher and urban commuter campuses, many will drop out before advancing to the next course, let alone graduate or move on to a four-year school.

Faced with a threatened cutoff of resources, colleges are trying new approaches to help students who lack basic skills. Those include self-paced with tutors rather than lecturers and developmental English classes that students can take simultaneously with freshman composition.

Explore further: Devices or divisive: Mobile technology in the classroom

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User comments : 3

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Ludwig99b0
5 / 5 (2) Sep 28, 2012
I'd like to make a useful comment, but this sort of story is really too sad for words.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Sep 29, 2012
Skills to be acquired must be custom tailored to the abilities we are born with - this 'custom tailoring' is non existence to all education systems to date.

How we learn is current research. Long overdue research. We can still use the buildings in which everyone is taught... to learn instead.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (1) Sep 29, 2012
The fix needs to occur in the k-12 time frame.
Demand govt, unionized schools produce educated students.

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