China adds 2 satellites to global positioning net

September 19, 2012

(AP)—China has added two more satellites to a global navigation network that will eventually compete with America's Global Positioning System.

State media say the 14th and 15th satellites in the Beidou system were launched aboard a single Long March 3B rocket early Wednesday. The system, whose name means compass in English, is due to have 35 satellites in total by its 2020 completion date.

The system already provides coverage over much of Asia, with at least one more satellite set for this year. China expects Beidou to generate a 400 billion yuan ($63 billion) annual market for services to the transport, and telecommunications sectors.

The system's military implications are just as important, freeing China from having to use GPS for tasks such as missiles guidance.

Explore further: China launches navigation satellite

0 shares

Related Stories

China launches gps satellite: report

April 15, 2009

China launched a navigational satellite, the nation's space administration reported, the second in a series of up to 30 orbiters to comprise a global positioning network.

China launches navigation satellite

April 10, 2011

China on Sunday launched its eighth satellite orbiter as part of its navigation and positioning network, state media reported.

China's satellite navigation system live

December 27, 2011

China's home-grown satellite navigation system launched a limited positioning service Tuesday, the official Xinhua news agency said, as the country seeks to break its dependence on foreign technology.

Recommended for you

Will SETI's unprecedented new program finally find E.T.?

August 4, 2015

Stephen Hawking, Frank Drake and dozens of journalists gathered at the Royal Society in London last week to hear astronomers announce a ground-breaking new project to search for intelligent extraterrestrial life called "Breakthrough ...

Tracking a mysterious group of asteroid outcasts

August 4, 2015

High above the plane of our solar system, near the asteroid-rich abyss between Mars and Jupiter, scientists have found a unique family of space rocks. These interplanetary oddballs are the Euphrosyne (pronounced you-FROH-seh-nee) ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.