New search engine offers better access to Congress

Sep 19, 2012 by Brett Zongker

(AP)—Congress is getting a new search engine to help people find bills that may become new laws.

On Wednesday, the is unveiling the new website Congress.gov in beta form to eventually replace its THOMAS system. It's Congress' first new search engine since THOMAS launched in 1995 when the Internet was in its infancy.

THOMAS gets 10 million visits each year. The 17-year-old became outdated, though, and required insider knowledge to navigate.

The new site is more like with one box to search all data. It can filter search results like a shopping site with categories of merchandise.

Search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing also can retrieve information from the site.

Explore further: European Central Bank hit by data theft

More information: www.congress.gov

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