Tropical Storm Kirk looks more like a comet on NASA infrared imagery

Aug 29, 2012
On Aug. 29 at 12:29 am EDT the AIRS instrument on Aqua captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kirk's clouds. Cloud top temperatures were colder (purple) than –63F (-52C) around the center of circulation and west of the center. That's where the strongest storms and heaviest rainfall were occurring. Kirk appears to resemble a comet because windshear is pushing clouds and showers to the northeast. Credit: Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Tropical Storm Kirk looks more like a comet than a tropical storm in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite because of wind shear. NASA infrared imagery also revealed powerful thunderstorms around the center of circulation which are indicators that Kirk will continue strengthening. Meanwhile, another low pressure area appears to be organizing in the eastern Atlantic, far to the southeast of Kirk.

Tropical Depression Kirk formed from the eleventh tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season. Tropical Depression 11 formed on Aug. 28 at 5 p.m. EDT about 1,270 miles (2,045 km) east-northeast of the Lesser Antilles.

On Aug. 29 at 12:29 a.m. EDT the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured on Tropical Storm Kirk's clouds. Cloud top temperatures were colder than

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User comments : 4

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cantdrive85
1 / 5 (3) Aug 29, 2012
Being that electrical phenomenon are scalable, it shouldn't be a surprise to see similarities among electrical phenomenon throughout our 'Plasma Universe'.
panorama
not rated yet Aug 29, 2012
I think the article should have been title, "Tropical Storm Kirk resembles a comet on NASA infared imagery"

Because that still looks like a storm to me.
extinct
3 / 5 (2) Aug 30, 2012
Angels don't play this HAARP
jsdarkdestruction
1 / 5 (1) Aug 31, 2012
where, precisely, is the plasma in this tropical storm?