Space race, on a budget, was not how Armstrong saw it

Aug 26, 2012 by Naomi Seck
This picture taken on July 23, 1970 in Washington shows Apollo 11 space mission US astronaut Neil Armstrong. More than 40 years after Armstrong landed on the moon, humans continue to push the frontiers of space exploration but missions are being tempered by costs, a trend that concerned the astronaut.

More than 40 years after Neil Armstrong landed on the moon, humans continue to push the frontiers of space exploration but missions are being tempered by costs, a trend that concerned the astronaut.

The blank check from government that financed adventures in the Cold War-era is no longer available, with today's missions depending more on the private sector and international cooperation—often because of budget considerations.

Armstrong, who died Saturday, criticized President in 2010 for cost-cutting plans that, in part, retired the US shuttles—effectively ending the American role in sending humans out of Earth's orbit.

Now, US astronauts—whose predecessors worked feverishly to beat Russia's efforts to the moon—ride as passengers on , and hopes for NASA's own future manned flights to the International Space Station are pinned on private companies, which are trying to build cheaper shuttle alternatives.

Armstrong feared becoming reliant on other nations for spaceflight and that private companies would take too long to develop new space-worthy vehicles.

"I support the encouragement of the newcomers toward their goal of lower cost access to space," Armstrong said. "But having cut my teeth in rockets more than 50 years ago, I am not confident."

US analysts, however, say the country's space program had no choice but to change, given new global realities.

"The world evolves, humanity evolves, our capabilities evolve. And the future of space exploration, therefore, must also evolve," said Jeff Foust, an aerospace consultant and the editor of TheSpaceReview.com.

For one thing, flights into lower-Earth-orbit are now routine, and privatizing them allows the space agency to focus its efforts on more cutting edge missions, according the Foust.

But there are no footsteps on Mars, and many other hopes that were dreamed of when Armstrong and crewmate helped mankind make its "giant leap" in 1969 are still unrealized.

Foust said the succeed-at-any-cost mentality that drove the Apollo program to get the first person on the moon cannot be replicated.

That program "was the result of the particular geopolitical factors, that Cold War atmosphere," Foust explained.

"We need to find different approaches that can be sustained, probably at lower funding levels than we had under Apollo, but over longer periods of time," he added.

Roger Launius, senior curator and historian at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, noted that Obama's cuts at NASA follow two decades of financial slashing since the Cold War ended.

At the height of the moon-landing effort, NASA was allocated fully five percent of the federal budget, Launius told AFP.

For much of the 1970s and 1980s, NASA's share stayed steady at one percent, he explained, but "today it's less than one half of one percent of the federal budget."

Still Launius insisted the US space program continues to make important gains—not least of which was landing the Curiosity rover on Mars last month.

Over the next decade, Launius said, "we're going to send robots literally all over the solar system. We're doing that now. And we're going to learn more about the Cosmos. We're also sending robots and satellites into space to monitor the earth to understand what's happening here.

"That's not personal jet packs. And its not colonies on the moon. It's not the Jetsons," he joked, referring to a once-popular cartoon about a space-age family. "But is is very real and very important."

These missions, however, have often failed to stoke the public's imagination the way Apollo's astronauts once did.

One consequence is a ricochet effect on NASA's ability to do the bigger more ambitious projects that do inspire people, said Keith Cowing, a former NASA employee and editor at NASAwatch.com, an unaffiliated website following the agency's activities.

"NASA needs to be able to tell its story far better than it does. If people truly understood what space exploration is about, and the promise that it offers, they'd be clamoring to triple 's budget," he said.

Barring that, Foust said international cooperation and private sector gains will allow greater achievements all around.

"International partnerships"—like the ones behind the —"give us the tool to do things that would be more difficult or impossible for individual nations to do," he said.

Such a model will likely form the basis of future human , "particularly the really big and expensive missions like sending people to Mars."

Explore further: Video gives astronaut's-eye view inside NASA's Orion spacecraft

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User comments : 8

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Ophelia
4.5 / 5 (2) Aug 26, 2012
"Armstrong, who died Saturday, criticized President Barack Obama in 2010 for cost-cutting plans that, in part, retired the US space shuttles—effectively ending the American role in sending humans out of Earth's orbit."

Just want to point out that the principal reason for retirement of the shuttle fleet was the report of the Columbia disaster investigation that set the deadline for retirement of the fleet after construction of the ISS was completed due largely because of danger inherent in the design of the orbiter and orbiter stack and obsolescence.

In point of fact, the shuttle program had long been ineffective from a cost standpoint. But boy were they fun to watch.
CapitalismPrevails
1.8 / 5 (5) Aug 26, 2012
But boy were they fun to watch.

Yup, there's nothing like those bureaucracies who's vested interest is keeping up the status quo with good public optics.
I thought i remembered Armstrong and Aldrin stating before congress about NASA privatization and how they didn't like it. I guess when you get older you are more set in your ways.
ValeriaT
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 26, 2012
Armstrong, who died Saturday, criticized President Barack Obama in 2010 for cost-cutting plans that, in part, retired the US space shuttles
Why he did not criticize the George Bush government, which initiated the financial crisis leading to these cost-cutting plans? If the memory of Americans is shorter than four years, then it's not surprising, they tend to repeat the same mistakes again and again.
Foundation
3 / 5 (2) Aug 26, 2012
The Bush government initiated the retirement of the shuttles. The Obama government cancelled the constellation program, the supposed successor to the shuttle.
CapitalismPrevails
1.7 / 5 (6) Aug 26, 2012
Why he did not criticize the George Bush government, which initiated the financial crisis leading to these cost-cutting plans? If the memory of Americans is shorter than four years, then it's not surprising, they tend to repeat the same mistakes again and again.
I think your memory only lasts 4 years. What existed before the Housing Bubble? The central planning Federal Reserve Bank, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the CRA Act, Acorn suing banks for not lending money to minorities because it wouldn't be profitable, etc. I guess none of this government intrusion had any precedent in the recession? Libs always blame greed in the private sector but its never the other way around. You can NEVER be GREEDY for power by law nor be GREEDY for higher taxes because those things are supposedly good intentioned.
Shootist
2 / 5 (4) Aug 27, 2012
Why he did not criticize the George Bush government, which initiated the financial crisis leading to these cost-cutting plans? If the memory of Americans is shorter than four years, then it's not surprising, they tend to repeat the same mistakes again and again.
I think your memory only lasts 4 years. What existed before the Housing Bubble? The central planning Federal Reserve Bank, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the CRA Act, Acorn suing banks for not lending money to minorities because it wouldn't be profitable, etc. I guess none of this government intrusion had any precedent in the recession? Libs always blame greed in the private sector but its never the other way around. You can NEVER be GREEDY for power by law nor be GREEDY for higher taxes because those things are supposedly good intentioned.


Ignoring all else, leftists only know what they're told.

"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for western civilization as it commits suicide." - James Burnham
Jeddy_Mctedder
3.4 / 5 (5) Aug 27, 2012
screw manned spaceflight. it is almost pointless. sorry, but until it's about 10 times cheaper to get up into space, manned spaceflight has little point other than to dazzle us with interesting zero-gravity physics demonstrations from the international space station.

name me 5 fundamental science discoveries from manned research in space that couldn't be done by robots. try naming 1.

Vendicar_Decarian
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 27, 2012
Destroying NASA has long been a Republican dream.

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