Seeds of hope amidst Philippine floods

Aug 14, 2012

Amidst horrendous flooding around Manila and major rice-growing across Luzon in the Philippines, some good news has emerged for rice farmers – Submarino rice – rice that can survive around 2 weeks of being under water.

is unique because it can grow well in wet conditions where other crops cannot, but if it is covered with water completely it can die, leaving flooded farmers bereft of income.

Submarino rice was bred by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and can survive floods if they occur before flowering. The latest Submarino variety was released in the Philippines in 2009 and disseminated and promoted by the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) and the Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) to help rice farmers in times of floods and typhoons.

Philippine Secretary of Agriculture Proceso Alcala said, "IRRI is one of our partner agencies that studies and promotes the propagation of Submarino rice varieties that can recover even after being submerged for 14 days."

Since its release, Submarino rice has been widely adopted by rice farmers across the thanks to efforts by the DA and its agencies, which have been actively promoting Submarino rice to farmers. Their effective strategies have included involving farmers in early field trials and seed multiplication efforts across the country alongside information, education, extension, and communication campaigns and materials.

"By planting Submarino rice, farmers have a fighting chance to outlast most rains and floods that unfortunately beset the country," said IRRI Deputy Director General for Communications and Partnerships Dr. V. Bruce J. Tolentino.

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Provided by International Rice Research Institute

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