Judge scolds Samsung, lets patent trial proceed

August 3, 2012
The judge in a massive smartphone patent case reprimanded Samsung for releasing excluded evidence on Friday but rejected a bid by Apple to order a verdict in the case.

The judge in a massive smartphone patent case reprimanded Samsung for releasing excluded evidence on Friday but rejected a bid by Apple to order a verdict in the case.

Judge Lucy Koh expressed irritation with Samsung's releasing to the media of documents she had ruled were not to be viewed by the jury in the case over involving the and other .

Koh said Samsung lawyers "were on notice that the possibility of a jury taint was real," and scolded them for "a willful attempt to propagate that evidence they knew had been excluded."

But she rejected Apple's request for additional sanctions or to order a verdict in favor of the firm.

She polled the jurors, asking if they had read any press coverage. One said he read a headline online, but did not read any articles. The others said they had read nothing.

"I will not let any theatrics or sideshows distract us from what we are here to do which is to fairly hear this case," said Koh.

Apple said in court documents released Thursday that "Samsung and its counsel have engaged in bad faith litigation misconduct by attempting to prejudice the jury" by releasing documents suggesting Samsung was working on its own before the iPhone was released.

Individuals line up to enter the Robert F. Peckham United States Courthouse Building to watch Apple and Samsung face each other in federal district court for a patent infringement case in July 2012. The judge in the case reprimanded Samsung for releasing excluded evidence on Friday but rejected a bid by Apple to order a verdict in the case.

"Samsung was not allowed to tell the jury the full story and show the pre-iPhone design... in development at Samsung in 2006, before the iPhone," said the statement from the South Korean firm.

Apple's of worldwide marketing, Philip Schiller, was set to testify Friday.

on Tuesday began hearing the biggest US patent trial in decades, with billions at stake for the tech giants.

Apple is seeking more than $2.5 billion in a case accusing the South Korean firm of infringing on designs and other patents from the iPhone and iPad maker.

This is one of several cases in courts around the world involving the two electronics giants in the hottest part of the tech sector -- tablet computers and smartphones.

While the results so far have been mixed in courts in Europe and Australia, Samsung is clearly on the defensive in the US case.

Explore further: Apple wants billions from Samsung in patent fight

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1 / 5 (4) Aug 03, 2012
It's really hard to feel bad for either side. Billionaires suing billionaires.
3.9 / 5 (7) Aug 03, 2012
The real question is has anyone done a thorough investigation to see if this judge has any stock in Apple, because their rulings seem to to be biased in Apples favor. Apple says everyone copied them, but Samsung showing they were already working on a smartphone before the Iphone's release would show that 'smartphones' are essentially obvious technological progress (over the palm pilot and RIM blackberry) and that Apple didn't event the wheel and every other thing they try to say they invented first ;P

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