Samsung begins producing fastest embedded NAND storage

Aug 02, 2012

Samsung Electronics announced today that it has now begun volume production of an ultra-fast embedded memory for smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices in 16-, 32- and 64-gigabyte (GB) densities.

The new eMMC (embedded multimedia card) Pro Class 1500 delivers the industry's fastest speeds for an embedded , reading data sequentially at up to 140 per second (MB/s) and writing it at up to 50 MB/s. For random reading and writing, it can process up to 3500/1500 IOPS (inputs and outputs per second), four times the speed of previous eMMC solutions.

"With the production of 64GB Samsung eMMC Pro Class 1500, we are delighted to provide the highest performing mobile available that support the latest eMMC standard, for worldwide mobile device makers," said JaeHyeong Lee, vice president, Memory Product Planning & Application Engineering, . "We will confidently strengthen our research and development efforts to continually bring to market the most advanced mobile storage devices based on next-generation standards."

The Samsung eMMC Pro Class 1500 is designed for next generation premium mobile products. It will improve system performance and the user experience for a wide variety of applications including web browsing, 3D and HD video capture and playback, multi-tasking activities, augmented reality and the use of social networking sites and interactive graphics-rich gaming.

The ultra high-speed storage device uses Samsung's 64-gigabit (Gb) NAND with a toggle DDR 2.0 interface based on the company's latest 20 nanometer class process technology. The new eMMC's fully managed NAND memory comes with its own high performance controller and intelligent flash management firmware.

To meet the market need for thinner designs for high-end , Samsung offers the new eMMCs in two, four- and eight-die stacks with the largest capacity of 64GB's being only 1.2 millimeters thick.

Samsung eMMC Pro Class 1500 is the first to support the latest JEDEC e-MMC v4.5 specification that standardizes more features to improve performance, efficiency, security, and reliability such as: a SDR-200 Interface (200MHz, 200MB/s Max Bandwidth), cache handling, dynamic handling, file sanitizing and power-off notification.

Featuring highly reliable boot code and application storage, Samsung's 64GB eMMC can store 16,000 MP3 files in a single package that weighs only 0.6 grams.

Samsung provided the first 64GB eMMC in January of 2010 using 30nm-class 32Gb NAND flash components.

Explore further: Toshiba to launch world's fastest microSD memory cards

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Samsung Produces 60-Nanometer 8-Gigabit NAND Flash Memory

Jul 19, 2006

Samsung Electronics today announced that it has begun mass producing an 8-Gigabit (Gb) NAND flash memory device, providing a much larger and more affordable storage density for consumer and mobile applications ...

Recommended for you

Review: With Galaxy S5, Samsung proves less can be more

1 minute ago

Samsung Electronics Co. has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5S: the Galaxy S5. The device, released over the weekend, is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S ...

Chinese tech giant Alibaba set to make a splash with US IPO

13 minutes ago

The largest tech IPO of the year will come from a company that many Americans have never heard of. Alibaba Group - a Chinese e-commerce behemoth - has decided to go public in the U.S. after months of speculation that it would ...

Hackers of Oman news agency target Bouteflika

5 hours ago

Hackers on Sunday targeted the website of Oman's official news agency, singling out and mocking Algeria's newly re-elected president Abdelaziz Bouteflika as a handicapped "dictator".

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackers of Oman news agency target Bouteflika

Hackers on Sunday targeted the website of Oman's official news agency, singling out and mocking Algeria's newly re-elected president Abdelaziz Bouteflika as a handicapped "dictator".

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.