New record in quantum communications

Aug 30, 2012
New record in quantum communications
Dr Boris Hage, Mr Seiji Armstrong, Professor Hans Bachor, Dr Jiri Janousek, Dr Katherine Wagner and Dr Jean-Francois Morizur.

(Phys.org)—Researchers from The Australian National University have taken a quantum leap towards developing the next-generation super-fast networks needed to drive future computing.

Mr Seiji Armstrong, a PhD researcher from the Department of in the ANU College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, has led a team which has developed a technique that allows for to travel at higher bandwidth using a beam of light and the phenomenon called entanglement. Mr Armstrong's research is published in Nature Communications.

"Broadly speaking, entanglement is when two things are correlated in some way so that by measuring one of them, you can infer information about the other. It is important because without it, it's impossible to teleport quantum information," said Mr Armstrong.

"This quirk was discovered by Einstein in 1935 and from the late 1980s people started suggesting that entanglement might be useful for processing information. It turned out that by encoding information into systems that are entangled you can perform computations that are unfeasible for ordinary computers.

"The problem is we realised that entanglement experiments around the world were getting very complicated. Each entangled mode of light required its own laser beam, as well as a whole range of other equipment. Given that a quantum computer would need hundreds or thousands of entangled states of light, this was impossibly complicated."

Mr Armstrong said that their research dramatically simplified this process.

"We were able to entangle eight quantum modes of light within one laser beam, a practice that used to require eight separate beams," he said.

"Our research is also a world first, as the previous best entanglement was four modes of light in the one laser in 2011. Our research shows that it is now possible to create a light beam with relatively a lot of quantum information on it. "

Explore further: Longer distance quantum teleportation achieved

Related Stories

Quantum memory for communication networks of the future

Nov 08, 2010

Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in storing quantum information using two 'entangled' light beams. Quantum memory or information storage is a necessary ...

Large scale qubit generation for quantum computing

Jul 27, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- "Many people are trying to build a quantum computer," Olivier Pfister tells PhysOrg.com. "One to the problems, though, is that you need hundreds of thousands of qubits. So far, scalability has been someth ...

Quantum optical link sets new time records

Aug 17, 2011

Quantum communication could be an option for the absolutely secure transfer of data. The key component in quantum communication over long distances is the special phenomenon called entanglement between two ...

Discord strikes the right quantum note

Aug 06, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Scientists have taken a quantum leap forward towards future computing after discovering that ‘background interference’ in quantum-level measurements, may be the very thing they need ...

A solid case of entanglement

Jan 11, 2010

Physicists have finally managed to demonstrate quantum entanglement of spatially separated electrons in solid state circuitry.

Recommended for you

How cloud chambers revealed subatomic particles

16 hours ago

Atoms are made of electrons, protons and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are in turn made up of quarks. These are just some of the elementary particles that make up the foundation of modern particle physics. ...

When a doughnut becomes an apple

16 hours ago

In experiments using the wonder material graphene, ETH researchers have been able to demonstrate a phenomenon predicted by a Russian physicist more than 50 years ago. They analyzed a layer structure that ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (2) Aug 31, 2012
"Broadly speaking, entanglement is when two things are correlated in some way so that by measuring one of them, you can infer information about the other. It is important because without it, it's impossible to teleport quantum information," said Mr Armstrong.

By the way, it is interesting to note that physicists still not know how the entanglement works! May be it was misinterpreted, because we also do not know the mechanism of quantum mechanics in which it was based. This physical mechanism view of quantum mechanics below may help to understand the situation.
http://www.vacuum...19〈=en