Post-Fukushima meeting calls for more work on nuclear safety

Aug 31, 2012
Governor of Fukushima prefecture, Yuhei Sato is pictured during a meeting with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General in Vienna. A major international conference reviewing the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster in Japan in March 2011 wrapped up Friday calling for more to be done to improve nuclear safety.

A major international conference reviewing the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster in Japan in March 2011 wrapped up Friday calling for more to be done to improve nuclear safety.

"We have made headway in the current stage in drawing lessons from the Fukushima accident through this meeting," said China's Li Ganjie, president of the Convention on meeting, in closing remarks.

"But the process of learning lessons is far from finished. The international community needs to further enhance communication and raise their awareness to a new level ... and reflect upon the accident from a broader perspective.

"Measures have to be taken to avoid recurrence of similar accidents while guarding against the harm of radiation," Li said after the five-day meeting at headquarters in Vienna.

The second extraordinary meeting of the CNS involved around 700 delegates from the 75 states that are party to the 1994 convention, drawn up in the aftermath of the in Ukraine in 1986.

A off Japan in March 2011 created a tsunami that swamped the Fukushima Daiichi plant, sending three reactors into meltdown, spewing radiation over a large area and forcing the evacuation of thousands of people.

Since then countries with nuclear power have undertaken measures aimed at improving safety that were also reviewed in this week's meeting. They include "" on power plants, improving and more international cooperation.

Parties to the CNS made several revisions to "procedures and guidance" at the Vienna meeting in order to ensure more robust peer reviews and greater transparency.

A working group was also established to report to the next review meeting in March-April 2014 on a list of actions to strengthen the CNS and on proposals to amend, when necessary, the convention.

Explore further: Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Watchdogs urge completion of post-Fukushima checks

Jun 08, 2011

Nuclear regulatory agencies called on Wednesday for national watchdogs to complete post-Fukushima checks but stressed plant operators should not escape their "prime responsibility" for reactor safety.

Nuclear experts to help Fukushima decontamination

Oct 04, 2011

The UN atomic agency IAEA said Tuesday it was sending 12 international experts to Japan on October 7-15 to assist the country with clean-up efforts after the nuclear accident of Fukushima in March.

Japan vows to continue nuclear plant exports

Aug 05, 2011

Japan said Friday it will continue exporting atomic power plants, despite uncertainty over its own use of them as it continues to grapple with a crisis at the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant.

Recommended for you

US urged to drop India WTO case on solar

13 hours ago

Environmentalists Wednesday urged the United States to drop plans to haul India to the WTO to open its solar market, saying the action would hurt the fight against climate change.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

20 hours ago

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

Apr 23, 2014

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Bloomberg invests $5M in solar-powered lamp

Apr 22, 2014

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's foundation has announced a $5 million investment in an artsy-looking solar-powered lamp designed for use in off-grid populations in Africa.

User comments : 0

More news stories

SK Hynix posts Q1 surge in net profit

South Korea's SK Hynix Inc said Thursday its first-quarter net profit surged nearly 350 percent from the previous year on a spike in sales of PC memory chips.

FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes.

Brazil enacts Internet 'Bill of Rights'

Brazil's president signed into law on Wednesday a "Bill of Rights" for the digital age that aims to protect online privacy and promote the Internet as a public utility by barring telecommunications companies ...

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

Colorful church windows, beads on a necklace and many of our favorite plastics share something in common—they all belong to a state of matter known as glasses. School children learn the difference between ...

FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

The federal government wants to prohibit sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels under regulations being proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.