5 things you may not know about the planet Mars

Aug 03, 2012
Mars

Mars is set to get its latest visitor Sunday night when NASA's new robotic rover, named Curiosity, attempts to land there. Mars has been a prime target for space exploration for decades, in part because its climate 3.5 billion years ago is believed to have been warm and wet, like early Earth.

Here are five other key points:

—About the color: It's called the red planet because the landscape is stained rusty-red by the iron-rich dust.

—Quick weight loss: Its gravity is only 38 percent that of Earth. So if you weigh 150 pounds (68 kilograms) on Earth, you would weigh 57 pounds (26 kilograms) on Mars.

—Hot and cold: Mars' temperatures can range from 80 degrees Fahrenheit (27 Celsius) at its equator to -199 Fahrenheit (-128 Celsius) at its poles.

—The air is different: Mars' atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide with traces of nitrogen and argon. Earth's atmosphere is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen and other gases.

—Longer days: They last 40 minutes longer than a day on Earth.

Explore further: Curiosity brushes 'Bonanza king' target anticipating fourth red planet rock drilling

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User comments : 13

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roboferret
3 / 5 (6) Aug 03, 2012

About the color: It's called the red planet because the landscape is stained rusty-red by the iron-rich dust.


Which should have been the FIRST clue that the image in the article is of the wrong motherflipping PLANET!

That is Venus, which is unlike Mars in almost every conceivable way, not least its appearance. Epic publishing failure.

http://en.wikiped...eruv.jpg
Sinister1811
1.7 / 5 (6) Aug 03, 2012
5 things you may not know about the planet Mars


But, first, we shall link an image of Venus to the article.
DarkHorse66
2.7 / 5 (6) Aug 03, 2012
Erm, this image has an ice cap, the jpeg doesn't. Also, compare to:
http://en.wikiped...iki/Mars
It is almost identical to the image in this article.
Your jpeg does say "venus", not "mars".

Oops?

Cheers DH66 :]
roboferret
5 / 5 (3) Aug 03, 2012
They have changed the image! The original one was identical to the one I linked to.
DarkHorse66
3.7 / 5 (6) Aug 03, 2012
They have changed the image! The original one was identical to the one I linked to.

Maybe the editors saw and read your comment ....and DID go OOOPS! :D

Cheers, DH66
Anda
2 / 5 (2) Aug 03, 2012
They have changed the image! The original one was identical to the one I linked to.


U sure? I was about to tell u it was Mars ;)
roboferret
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 03, 2012
They have changed the image! The original one was identical to the one I linked to.


U sure? I was about to tell u it was Mars ;)

Very sure. I think Sinister1811 saw it too, I hope he/she will back me up! I wish they would acknowledge their mistake instead of silently revising it and hoping no-one would notice, making me look a fool in the process. Dear moderator, please remove my original comment or acknowledge that the wrong image was initially posted, I've already been down voted through no fault of my own!
julianpenrod
1 / 5 (6) Aug 03, 2012
A suggestion to roboferret. To avoid disputes about criticisms you launch at a web site or those on it, it can help to take a photograph of the screen. On a chemtrail site I once posted on, a "debunker" made a patently illegitimate, even humiliating, statement. "I mentioned it. The moderators of the site, who happened to be "debunkers" themselves, allowed the "debunker" I criticized to do something they disllowed all chemtrail opponents, they let the "debunker" change their mistaken comment. Then the "debunker" placed a comment saying I didn't know what I was talking about. I placed a picture on the site showing the contents of the original post compared to the new one.
SCVGoodToGo
5 / 5 (3) Aug 03, 2012
I saw it as well, it was most definitely Venus.
Bigbobswinden
5 / 5 (2) Aug 04, 2012
Come on, we managed to mix up the Korean flags at the Olympics, there is many a slip between cup and lip as my old Mom used to say.
Bewia
1.8 / 5 (4) Aug 04, 2012
Mars' atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide with traces of nitrogen and argon.
The atmosphere of Venus is similar, but the atmosphere of Earth is an exception. What brought the nitrogen into Earth atmosphere? Apparently something strange happened here.
DarkHorse66
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 06, 2012
They have changed the image! The original one was identical to the one I linked to.[/qVery sure. I think Sinister1811 saw it too, I hope he/she will back me up! I wish they would acknowledge their mistake instead of silently revising it and hoping no-one would notice, making me look a fool in the process. Dear moderator, please remove my original comment or acknowledge that the wrong image was initially posted, I've already been down voted through no fault of my own!

When I made my orig. post in this thread the correct image was already displaying.I suspected that a quiet substitution by the editors might have been the case,ESP since a 2nd poster appeared in agreement with the nature of the original complaint.That is why I waited for his response(INSTEAD of downranking)& gave him 5's for pointing out the error.I could also see the unintentional humour at the time.I also heartily agree that editors should acknowledge when they change something,ESP when it has already...cont
DarkHorse66
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 06, 2012
cont...been pointed out in the thread below. (even a quick physorg 'note' inserted into the thread would be sufficient. That is actually a matter of ethics, since it constitutes misleading behaviour. (Even newspapers are required to notify in print, of alterations and retractions and just like a paper, Physorg is a publication site.)The proof? A number of readers saw the revised image and fell for it hook, line and sinker (by assuming it to be the original one that came with the article) and carried out downvoting precisely because of this. It didn't occur to them that RF's (& Sinister's)opening remarks might actually have been factual and correct at time of posting. Physorg editors take note! At least we now all know that editors DO read our comments and changes DO get snuck in, even after the thread has been started. It's best to be careful. Remember, this kind of thing might happen to you too. Best Regards to all, DH66