Only two percent of Canadians deny climate change

Aug 24, 2012

Only two per cent of Canadians believe climate change is not occurring, a new important survey released today by IPAC-CO2 Research Inc. concluded.

The survey comes on the heels of Alberta Premier Alison Redford's recent push for a National Energy Strategy, which would address the future of Canada's oil and gas industries, and its approach to .

"Our survey indicates that Canadians from coast to coast overwhelmingly believe is real and is occurring, at least in part due to human activity" explained Dr. Carmen Dybwad, CEO of the environmental non-government organization. "These findings have been consistent from 2011 and 2012. Canadians care about issues like , drought and climate change."

Opinions about the cause of climate change and how to combat it are, however, sharply divided among the provinces and by region.

"Canadians most commonly (54%) believe that climate change is occurring partially due to human activity and partially due to variation," said Briana Brownell of Insightrix Research, who conducted the survey for IPAC-CO2.

"Residents of Quebec (44 %), Atlantic Canada (34%) and British Columbia (32 %) are more likely to believe climate change is occurring due to human activity than those on the Prairies (Alberta and Saskatchewan 21 %, Manitoba 24 %)."

Canadians are also divided on what they believe should be the priorities to fight climate change.

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Dr. Carmen Dybwad speaks to the media about the release of IPAC-CO2 Research Inc.'s 2012 national survey on Public Awareness and Acceptance of CCS in Canada, which found that only two percent of Canadians deny climate change. Credit: IPAC-CO2 Research Inc.

A total of 35% of Canadians believe the priority should be to promote cleaner cars running on electricity or low-carbon fuels while only 13% favored a tax on from the whole economy. Support for a is lowest in B.C. (6%) and highest in Quebec (24%).

A key solution cited by Canadians is Carbon Capture and Storage, or CCS, which involves capturing carbon dioxide from an industrial source of , transporting it, and storing it deep in the Earth's subsurface.

A majority of Canadians agree that capturing and storing carbon dioxide should be compulsory when building a new coal (59%) or natural gas (57%) power plant, though Canadians are concerned about the risks associated with CCS.

Quebec residents (71%) would be the most concerned if carbon dioxide was stored underground within 1.5 kilometres to 3 kilometres from their home, while Saskatchewan residents (43%) were the least worried.

Residents of B.C. (60%) are most likely to believe that the storage of carbon dioxide represents a safety risk in the future. Again, Saskatchewan residents (48%) are significantly less likely to hold this belief.

"CCS is not the "magic bullet" solution to combat climate change, but the development of CCS technology represents a necessary step in reducing Canada's emissions," said Dr. Dybwad.

For a second consecutive year, IPAC-CO2 contracted Insightrix Research, Inc. to conduct an online survey of Canadian residents. Survey responses were collected from 1,550 Canadians between May 29 and June 11.

The percentage of Canadians who are unsure whether or not they would benefit from CCS has increased notably from 42% in 2011 to 48% in 2012.

Residents of Ontario are more likely to believe that it would (33%) benefit them, while in Quebec the reverse is true, where 30% believe they would not benefit from the technology.

The proportion of Canadians who are unsure of the effectiveness of carbon capture and storage has increased notably from one quarter (24%) in 2011 to one third (35%) in 2012.

Despite the concerns many Canadians have about the technology, Dr. Dybwad remained optimistic about the future of CCS and its impact on Canada's environment.

"Canadians are concerned about the risks and benefits involved with CCS, but IPAC-CO2 exists to ensure that carbon dioxide is stored safely and permanently in the ground by providing risk and performance assessments of storage projects."

Explore further: Scottish people most sceptical on fracking, survey shows

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CapitalismPrevails
2.3 / 5 (12) Aug 24, 2012
Insightrix Research, who conducted the survey for IPAC-CO2.

For a second consecutive year, IPAC-CO2 contracted Insightrix Research, Inc. to conduct an online survey of Canadian residents.

Well i suppose there's no chance for corruption there. IPAC-CO2 has vested interest in Cap and Tax policies which depend on the AGW public validation.

Canadians agree that capturing and storing carbon dioxide should be compulsory when building a new coal (59%) or natural gas (57%) power plant
Just what IPAC-Co2 would want.

ryggesogn2
3 / 5 (12) Aug 24, 2012
Canadians should accept climate is changing since not long ago Canada was covered in ice.
NotParker
2.2 / 5 (10) Aug 24, 2012
The dirty thirties (dustbowl) occurred in Canada too. That was quite a change in climate.

"During the 1920s, Saskatchewan was one of the most prosperous farming areas in the world. By the 1930s, it was one of the most devastated. The cruel combination of the economic depression and the ravages of nature turned much of the province into a wasteland. Drought conditions first appeared in 1928 but grew steadily worse. In 1928, precipitation was half what had been the previous year.

The Dust Bowl Days
The year 1929 was no better and as the soil continued to bake, most of the vital subsoil moisture disappeared, especially in the southwestern dry belt. The drought continued for the next eight years and as it did, especially when it was accompanied by strong winds, much valuable topsoil similarly disappeared. The dust bowl had replaced the western breadbasket. About one quarter of all of Canada's arable land was affected by drought. Plagues of grasshoppers and plant rust only ... "
Vendicar_Decarian
3.4 / 5 (10) Aug 25, 2012
Canada was covered in ice 15,000 years ago, and that ice came and went due to well known changes in the orbital and rotational parameters of the earth.

"Canadians should accept climate is changing since not long ago Canada was covered in ice." - RyggTard

As the food basked of America rapidly reverts to desert due to anthropogenically induced global warming, RyggTard should as how he and his children intend to feed themselves?

Vendicar_Decarian
3.2 / 5 (9) Aug 25, 2012
And once again, the mental disease of ParkerTard causes him to confuse weather (dirty 30's, a single decade) with Climate, which is defined over periods of 3 decades or longer.

He also confuses a regional warming (the Dustbowl) with the current warming of the entire Globe.

"The dirty thirties (dustbowl) occurred in Canada too. That was quite a change in climate." - ParkerTard

He has been repeatedly told the differences. But his diseased mind long ago lost it's capacity to learn.
Vendicar_Decarian
3.2 / 5 (9) Aug 25, 2012
What is it about Canadians that makes them so much smarter than American Conservatives?

Is it the superior education system that socialism has provided Canada?

It must be a cultural effect.
NotParker
2.6 / 5 (5) Aug 25, 2012
"Climate, which is defined over periods of 3 decades or longer."

Climate: "the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, sunshine, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years."

The dustbowl was definitely climate.
ryggesogn2
2.7 / 5 (7) Aug 25, 2012
"Opinions about the cause of climate change and how to combat it are, however, sharply divided among the provinces and by region."

That was not what the headline implied.

Considering Canada has lowered taxes and cut govt spending, anti-socialist policies, Canada does seem to have some intelligence and a future.
Shootist
3.4 / 5 (5) Aug 25, 2012
I don't know anyone who denies that it is warmer now than 150 years ago.

No one I know believes CO2 is responsible for the rise in temperature.

"The polar bears will be fine". - Freeman Dyson (is smarter than all of you).
NotParker
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 25, 2012
I don't know anyone who denies that it is warmer now than 150 years ago.



It was both warmer and colder ...

http://berkeleyea...ison.pdf

January 1863 anomaly = 0.421

January 2011 anomaly = 0.413

As for 250 years ....

June 1761 2.070
June 2011 1.014