NASA watches Tropical Storm Florence develop and weaken

August 6, 2012
The AIRS instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite captured these infrared images of Florence on Aug. 4-5. The AIRS image from Aug. 4 showed a larger spiraled storm. By Aug. 5 when dry air started interacting with the system the area of stronger thunderstorms had diminished and the storm had a tight, small area of strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms around the center of circulation. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

The sixth tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed over the past weekend, and NASA kept an on its progression. Tropical Storm Florence was born in the eastern Atlantic and weakened when it interacted with dry air.

On Friday, August 3, the low pressure area known as "System 90L" was being watched for development. It was located south of the off the African coast. By the early evening (Eastern Daylight Time) it quickly organized. System 90L strengthened and became Tropical Storm Florence in the eastern Atlantic. Over August 4 and 5 Florence traveled west and weakened back to a tropical depression by August 6.

This visible image of Florence was captured on Aug. 5 at 1:45 p.m. EDT when it was still a tropical storm. This image comes from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. Credit: NASA/GOES Project

's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Florence on August 4 and 5. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard the satellite captured of the storm on both days. The AIRS image from Aug. 4 showed a larger spiraled storm. By Aug. 5 when dry air started interacting with the system the area of stronger thunderstorms had diminished and the storm had a tight, small area of strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms around the center of circulation.

On August 6 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Florence's were near 35 mph (55 kmh) with higher gusts. At 5 a.m. EDT the center of tropical depression Florence was located near latitude 16.2 north and longitude 38.8 west. Florence is moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kmh). The depression is expect to move in a westward or west-northwestward motion and speed up over the next couple of days.

After Florence became a tropical storm she ran into dry air and Saharan dust, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). At 5 a.m. EDT on Monday, August 6, the NHC noted "the cyclone has been devoid of deep for about six hours as dry air has become well embedded in the circulation."

at the National Hurricane Center expect Florence to track west across the Atlantic and south of Bermuda. On her western track, Florence is expected to degenerate to a remnant low within the next couple of days, because wind shear will increase from the west and batter the storm. Florence became a post-tropical storm on August 6 at 11 a.m. EDT as its winds dropped to 35 mph (55 kmh). It was located near latitude 16.4 north and longitude 40.2 west. Florence is expected to weaken further over the next couple of days.

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