NASA satellite sees strength in developing Atlantic tropical low

Aug 01, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99L on Aug. 1 at 0405 UTC (12:05 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. It showed that there was a small area of strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms (purple) around the center of circulation, indicating some strength in the low pressure area. Credit: Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

NASA's Aqua satellite spotted some very cold, high, thunderstorms around the center of a tropical low pressure area in the Atlantic Ocean today, indicating that the system is getting stronger and more organized.

The low pressure area, designated as "System 99L" was located about 850 miles east of the southern Windward Islands, near 10.7 North latitude and 46.9 West longitude. It was moving west between 15 and 20 mph.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99L on August 1 at 0405 UTC (12:05 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an of the storm. It showed that there was a small area of strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms around the center of circulation, indicating some strength in the low pressure area. shows temperature and the higher the cloud tops, the colder they are as they reach higher in the troposphere (lowest ). When cloud top temperatures are very cold, it's an indication of strong uplift in the atmosphere. The cloud top temperatures around the center of this low were near -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), and indicated powerful uplift and high cloud tops.

The National Hurricane Center noted that "environmental conditions are conducive for gradual development," and gives the storm a 70% chance of becoming a in the next two days. Residents in the Windward Islands should monitor the progress of System 99L.

If System 99L develops into a tropical storm, it would be named "Ernesto." The last tropical storm to form in the Atlantic Ocean this was Debby, and she dissipated over a month ago, on June 28.

Explore further: New detector sniffs out origins of methane

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Stuck-in-the-mud plankton reveal ancient temperatures

10 hours ago

New research in Nature Communications showing how tiny creatures drifted across the ocean before falling to the seafloor and being fossilised has the potential to improve our understanding of past climat ...

NASA sees Mozambique Channel's new tropical storm

10 hours ago

Tropical Cyclone 15S formed in the Mozambique Channel of the Southern Indian Ocean, and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite gathered data on its rainfall rates.

How rain is dependent on soil moisture

10 hours ago

It rains in summer most frequently when the ground holds a lot of moisture. However, precipitation is most likely to fall in regions where the soil is comparatively dry. This is the conclusion reached by ...

ESA image: Hungarian mosaic

11 hours ago

This image of Hungary, with the political border in white, is a mosaic of 11 scans by Sentinel-1A's radar from October to December 2014.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.