'Nano machine shop' shapes nanowires, ultrathin films

Aug 29, 2012 by Emil Venere
This illustration depicts a new "nano machine shop's" ability to shape tiny wires, an advance that represents a possible future manufacturing method for tiny structures with potentially revolutionary properties. Credit: Gary Cheng, Purdue University

(Phys.org)—A new "nano machine shop" that shapes nanowires and ultrathin films could represent a future manufacturing method for tiny structures with potentially revolutionary properties.

The structures might be "tuned" for applications ranging from high-speed electronics to and also may have greater strength and unusual traits such as ultrahigh magnetism and "plasmonic resonance," which could lead to improved optics, computers and electronics.

The researchers used their technique to stamp nano- and microgears; form tiny circular shapes out of a material called graphene, an ultrathin sheet of carbon that holds promise for advanced technologies; and change the shape of silver nanowires, said Gary Cheng, an associate professor of industrial engineering at Purdue University.

"We do this shaping at room temperature and , like a nano-machine shop," said Cheng, working with doctoral students Ji Li, Yiliang Liao,Ting-Fung Chung and Sergey Suslov and physics professor Yong P. Chen.

Graphene and nanowires – filaments 1,000 times thinner than a – have numerous potential applications. However, technologies are needed to tailor them for specific uses. The new method, called laser shock-induced shaping, makes it possible to tune nanowires by altering electrical and optoelectrical properties critical for electronic components and instruments.

The researchers also have shown how laser shock-induced shaping can be used to change the properties of graphene, a step toward harnessing the material for .

Findings were detailed in research papers published in the journal , and the work also was highlighted earlier this month in the News and Views section of the journal .

The technique works by using a multilayered sandwich structure that has a tiny mold at the bottom. Nanowires were situated directly above the mold, and other materials were layered between the nanowires and a glass cover sheet. Exposing this layered "forming unit" to an ultra-fast pulsing laser causes one of the layers to burn up, generating a downward pressure that forces the nanowires into the mold and changing their shape.

"The process could be scaled up for an industrial roll-to-roll manufacturing process by changing laser beam size and scanning speed," Cheng said. "The laser shock-induced shaping approach is fast and low-cost."

Part of the research, funded by the National Science Foundation, was carried out in a specialized clean room at the Birck Nanotechnology Center in Purdue's Discovery Park.

Explore further: 'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials

More information: Nanoscale Strainability of Graphene by Laser Shock Induced 3D Shaping, www.nature.com/nphoton/journal… photon.2012.186.html

Related Stories

Major advance in understanding how nanowires form

Mar 25, 2011

New insights into why and how nanowires take the form they do will have profound implications for the development of future electronic components. PhD student Peter Krogstrup from the Nano-Science Center at ...

Nanowires get into the groove

Aug 22, 2011

Weizmann Institute scientists have discovered that growing nanowires out, not up, can keep them in line.

Recommended for you

'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials

Dec 24, 2014

When it comes to engineering single-layer atomic structures, "minding the gap" will help researchers create artificial electronic materials one atomic layer at a time, according to a team of materials scientists. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.