US: Missile defense for NKorea threat, not China

Aug 24, 2012 by MATTHEW PENNINGTON

(AP)—The United States is in discussions with close ally Japan about expanding a missile defense system in Asia, the top U.S. general said Thursday.

Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was commenting on a Wall Street Journal report that the U.S. is discussing positioning an early warning radar in southern Japan, supplementing one already in place in the country's north, to contain threats from North Korea and to counter China's military.

The State Department, however, said the is not directed against China.

Dempsey said no decisions have been reached on expanding the radar.

"But it's certainly a topic of conversation because missile defense is important to both of our nations," Dempsey told reporters at the start of a meeting with his visiting Japanese counterpart, Gen. Shigeru Iwasaki, at the Pentagon.

Japan has worked closely with the U.S. for several years on missile defense, and has both land- and sea-based missile launchers.

North Korea's ballistic missiles are considered a threat to security in the Asia-Pacific region because of the risk of conflict erupting on the divided and heavily militarized , and because of the secretive North's nuclear weapons program. The long-range rockets it is developing have been test-fired over Japan and potentially could reach the U.S.

The North conducted its latest long-range in April, defying a U.N. ban. The North said the launch was intended to send an into space but it drew international condemnation as the rocket technology is similar to that used for ballistic missiles. The rocket disintegrated soon after takeoff.

U.S. defense planners are also concerned about China's military buildup, including its missile capabilities. The U.S. wants to enhance its longstanding military presence in the region as part of a rebalancing of its forces after a decade of fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq. China views this as part of a strategy to contain its rise.

To avoid misunderstandings, the U.S. has sought to boost exchanges with China's military, including a visit this week by the People's Liberation Army's deputy chief of general staff, Lt. Gen. Cai Yingting.

Cai is visiting U.S. Army bases in Texas, Missouri and Hawaii, as well as the Pentagon, in order to "see Army capabilities and discuss issues of mutual interest with senior military and defense leaders," Pentagon spokeswoman Cathy Wilkinson said in an e-mail to The Associated Press.

"Transparency and reciprocity are the foundation of a sustained, reliable and meaningful military-to-military relationship," Wilkinson said.

Cai's visit follows one in May by Chinese Defense Minister Gen. Liang Guanglie.

The State Department said the U.S. is taking a phased approach to in Asia, as it is in Europe and the Middle East.

"These are defensive systems. They don't engage unless missiles have been fired," department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told a news conference. "In the case of Asian systems, they are designed against a missile threat from North Korea. They are not directed at China."

She said the U.S. has broad discussions with China through military and political channels about the systems' intent.

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