Record radiation in fish off Japan nuclear plant

Aug 21, 2012
Fish on sale near Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011. A pair of greenlings have shown the highest level of radioactive caesium detected in fish and shellfish caught in waters off the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, its operator said Tuesday.

A pair of greenlings have shown the highest level of radioactive caesium detected in fish and shellfish caught in waters off Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, its operator said Tuesday.

The fishes, captured 20 kilometres (12.5 miles) off the plant on August 1, registered 25,800 becquerels of per kilo, Power Co. (TEPCO) said -- 258 times the level the government deems safe for consumption.

The previous record in fish and shellfish off Fukushima was 18,700 becquerels per kilo detected in cherry salmons, according to the government's Fisheries Agency.

TEPCO said the greenlings might have fed in radioactive hotspots and that it would sample more of the fish, their feed and the seabed soil in the area in the coming weeks to determine the cause of the high radiation.

Fishermen have been allowed since June to catch -- on an experimental basis -- several kinds of fish and shellfish, but only in areas more than 50 kilometres off the plant.

Those catches have shown only small amounts of radioactivity.

Greenlings have not been caught by fishermen off Fukushima since the and tsunami of March 2011 triggered meltdowns in reactors at the plant.

Explore further: US delays decision on Keystone pipeline project

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Nuclear contamination found beyond Japan no-go zone

Oct 05, 2011

High levels of radioactive contamination have been found in soil in the capital of Japan's Fukushima prefecture, a study showed Wednesday, prompting calls to make the area a voluntary evacuation zone.

Japan minister questions radioactive water dump

Dec 13, 2011

Japan's industry minister Tuesday rejected a plan by the operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to release low-level radioactive water into the sea without approval by local fishermen.

Record radiation levels detected at Fukushima reactor

Jun 27, 2012

TEPCO, the operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, said Wednesday record amounts of radiation had been detected in the basement of reactor number 1, further hampering clean-up operations.

Recommended for you

US delays decision on Keystone pipeline project

Apr 18, 2014

The United States announced Friday a fresh delay on a final decision regarding a controversial Canada to US oil pipeline, saying more time was needed to carry out a review.

New research on Earth's carbon budget

Apr 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —Results from a research project involving scientists from the Desert Research Institute have generated new findings surrounding some of the unknowns of changes in climate and the degree to which ...

User comments : 5

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Aug 21, 2012
That's really the problem with a meltdown: Whether it blows out to sea or comes down on land - we have no "plan B" for cleaning this stuff up.
Vendicar_Decarian
4.3 / 5 (3) Aug 21, 2012
Just think of a world which is nuclear powered and filled with 200,000 more nuclear reactors than today's 450.

What could possibly go wrong?
kochevnik
not rated yet Aug 21, 2012
we have no "plan B" for cleaning this stuff up.
How about fish-powered autos?
LuckyExplorer
3.5 / 5 (2) Aug 22, 2012
"What could possibly go wrong?"
A lot more than until today...
...not only could, but will go wrong

Every single additional nuclear reactor increases the risk...

Just to mention, in Belgium a relatively new reactor was shut down, very likely without option for a restart, "after the discovery of suspected cracks in the pressure vessel"

Worldwide another 10 to 15 reactors are suspected to face similar problems because they are equipped with the same vessels.

Reported by EurActiv and others:
http://www.euract...s-514321
Howhot
not rated yet Aug 22, 2012
How about fish-powered autos?

How about fish powered robotic rovers sent to other planets.
Man ... that would make for a weird sci-fi flick. Instead of the Mars Curiosity rover power by plutonium, imagine if it was running on a fish.

Oh never mind.

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...