Record radiation in fish off Japan nuclear plant

Aug 21, 2012
Fish on sale near Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011. A pair of greenlings have shown the highest level of radioactive caesium detected in fish and shellfish caught in waters off the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, its operator said Tuesday.

A pair of greenlings have shown the highest level of radioactive caesium detected in fish and shellfish caught in waters off Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, its operator said Tuesday.

The fishes, captured 20 kilometres (12.5 miles) off the plant on August 1, registered 25,800 becquerels of per kilo, Power Co. (TEPCO) said -- 258 times the level the government deems safe for consumption.

The previous record in fish and shellfish off Fukushima was 18,700 becquerels per kilo detected in cherry salmons, according to the government's Fisheries Agency.

TEPCO said the greenlings might have fed in radioactive hotspots and that it would sample more of the fish, their feed and the seabed soil in the area in the coming weeks to determine the cause of the high radiation.

Fishermen have been allowed since June to catch -- on an experimental basis -- several kinds of fish and shellfish, but only in areas more than 50 kilometres off the plant.

Those catches have shown only small amounts of radioactivity.

Greenlings have not been caught by fishermen off Fukushima since the and tsunami of March 2011 triggered meltdowns in reactors at the plant.

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User comments : 5

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jimsworldsandiego
Aug 21, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Aug 21, 2012
That's really the problem with a meltdown: Whether it blows out to sea or comes down on land - we have no "plan B" for cleaning this stuff up.
Vendicar_Decarian
4.3 / 5 (3) Aug 21, 2012
Just think of a world which is nuclear powered and filled with 200,000 more nuclear reactors than today's 450.

What could possibly go wrong?
kochevnik
not rated yet Aug 21, 2012
we have no "plan B" for cleaning this stuff up.
How about fish-powered autos?
LuckyExplorer
3.5 / 5 (2) Aug 22, 2012
"What could possibly go wrong?"
A lot more than until today...
...not only could, but will go wrong

Every single additional nuclear reactor increases the risk...

Just to mention, in Belgium a relatively new reactor was shut down, very likely without option for a restart, "after the discovery of suspected cracks in the pressure vessel"

Worldwide another 10 to 15 reactors are suspected to face similar problems because they are equipped with the same vessels.

Reported by EurActiv and others:
http://www.euract...s-514321
Howhot
not rated yet Aug 22, 2012
How about fish-powered autos?

How about fish powered robotic rovers sent to other planets.
Man ... that would make for a weird sci-fi flick. Instead of the Mars Curiosity rover power by plutonium, imagine if it was running on a fish.

Oh never mind.

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