Explore a room with a Mars view

Aug 05, 2012
JPL's Mission Support Area (MSA), shown in this panorama, will be the hub of activity on Aug. 5 as mission team members monitor the careful and intricate entry, descent and landing of NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars.

(Phys.org) -- On the evening of Sunday, Aug. 5, the focal point of Martian activity here on Earth will be located in the Mission Support Area in Building 230 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. From this facility will come news of the progress of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover's landing.

Visit an interactive page at bit.ly/mslmsa to explore the room a bit further and get a who's who of team members - as well as the history of one dry-roasted room essential.

NASA's Mars and its Curiosity rover are a project of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. The mission is managed by JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Curiosity was designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

Explore further: SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

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