Dispatch software combines multiple internet connections into one

Aug 24, 2012 by Bob Yirka report
Dispatch software combines multiple internet connections into one

(Phys.org)—Imagine for a moment you're sitting at your computer at home, staring at the little bar noting the progress of a movie you've decided to download, from a legitimate site of course. You remember seeing all those other Wi-Fi connections your neighbors have going, most of them likely without password protection. If only there were a way to funnel them all together into one stream, giving you unprecedented download bandwidth. Notwithstanding the illegality of sucking bandwidth from your neighbors, it appears a solution is on the horizon.

Alex Gizis, CEO of a company called Connectify has posted a project on Kickstarter whose aim is to create a software product that allows people to pull together multiple Ethernet connections into one, multiplying the amount of data that can be transmitted at once. He calls it Dispatch and to prove that it's for real, he's posted a video demonstrating its capabilities on the page. And fortunately for all of us, it appears he and his company are near their goal of collecting the $50,000 they think they'll need to finish the software and bring it to market.

It doesn't have to be just multiple Wi-Fi signals either; the software can combine a standard wall connection, Wi-Fi, a tethered or even a card. It also doesn't appear to have a limit on the number of connections that can be combined, so users would be constrained only by the number of they are able to connect to their computer. In the video demo, the team added enough hardware to their to combine all of the available Wi-Fi in their neighborhood (by going up on the roof of their building) and managed to get a 85Mbs connection.

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Of course, not everyone is willing to grab whatever Wi-Fi is available, but that doesn't mean they are out of luck. Most users with Wi-Fi at home get their access via cable, thus they could plug in a dedicated cable and still use the built in Wi-Fi to bump up their throughput.

One important thing to note about Dispatch, it doesn't speed up your connection, it just allows more data to pass through to your computer; sort of like turning on two water taps at home to fill a basin, rather than just one. The water runs out at the same speed, but the sink fills twice as fast.

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User comments : 6

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Jeddy_Mctedder
1 / 5 (1) Aug 24, 2012
now for dispatching single high speed bandwidth connections into many slower speed bandwidth connections, while making sure no one hogs them all or uses them for downloading movies or other such stuff that clogs it up.

with more efficient usage of bandwidth and hog-surveillance you could easily get twice as much utility per person out of a given amount of bandwidth in a given urban area.
El_Nose
not rated yet Aug 24, 2012
microsoft has a special driver for this on their website -- they made it years ago -- patent infringement is no one's friend
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Aug 24, 2012
If only there were a way to funnel them all together into one stream, giving you unprecedented download bandwidth.


Doing that would actually saturate the local routers, unless it's only you doing it and nobody else. The ISP always oversells the network capacity under the assumption that not all of the users in a building or a city block will be using all of it at once, and if they do then they'll just throttle everyone equally.

For example, one of the networks I use actually has something like 200 Mbps of bandwidth to the internet, yet there are hundreds of customers with 10 Mbps DSL lines sold to them. I'd estimate each of them actually has less than 256 kbps reserved, which means the ISP has oversold the network capacity more than 40 times.

And this is the real reason why Comcast wants to throttle torrents.
PatTheRat
not rated yet Aug 25, 2012
I don't believe the inventor researched this very much, as this has been possible for at least a couple of years now. In Windows 7, you connect to all the hotspots and then bridge them together. We have done this at several client locations so that they have redundancy in the case of a failure of one or multiple ISP providers, but also provides faster speed. So will someone give me $50,000 for showing how to do it???? :-)
PatTheRat
not rated yet Aug 25, 2012
Tried to post the link, but the spam filter here will not allow it. Just research "Microsoft Virtual WiFi" and you'll get more info on the many ways to do this. Microsoft has had the technology for years now.
Skultch
not rated yet Aug 31, 2012
I don't believe the inventor researched this very much, as this has been possible for at least a couple of years now. In Windows 7, you connect to all the hotspots and then bridge them together. We have done this at several client locations so that they have redundancy in the case of a failure of one or multiple ISP providers, but also provides faster speed. So will someone give me $50,000 for showing how to do it???? :-)


Bonding the same type of services is easy. Bonding DOCSIS (cable modem)with DSL, or WiFi, or T1, etc, to each other never works well, even with the expensive load balancing routers currently on the market. Up until I read this, I was under the impression that no one had figured out a good protocol to handle all the different routes, latencies and packet losses, and that's just the beginning of the hurdles. You are going to get non-zero packet loss with any wireless transmission anywhere outside a controlled lab setting.