Curiosity beams new will.i.am song from Mars

Aug 28, 2012
In this image released by NASA on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012, an image taken by the Mast Camera (MastCam) highlights the geology of Mount Sharp, a mountain inside Gale Crater, where the rover landed. Prior to the rover's landing on Mars, observations from orbiting satellites indicated that the lower reaches of Mount Sharp, below the line of white dots, are composed of relatively flat-lying strata that bear hydrated minerals. Those orbiter observations did not reveal hydrated minerals in the higher, overlying strata. The MastCam data now reveal a strong discontinuity in the strata above and below the line of white dots, agreeing with the data from orbit. Strata overlying the line of white dots are highly inclined (dipping from left to right) relative to lower, underlying strata. The inclination of these strata above the line of white dots is not obvious from orbit. This provides independent evidence that the absence of hydrated minerals on the upper reaches of Mount Sharp may coincide with a very different formation environment than lower on the slopes. The train of white dots may represent an "unconformity," or an area where the process of sedimentation stopped. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

(AP)—Will.i.am has premiered his new single—from Mars.

The NASA rover Curiosity beamed to Earth his new song "Reach for the Stars" on Tuesday in the first music broadcast from another planet, to the delight of students who gathered at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to listen.

Will.I.Am, with Black Eyed Peas, sings at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012, in Pasadena, Calif. The NASA rover Curiosity beamed to Earth his new song "Reach for the Stars" on Tuesday in the first music broadcast from another planet, to the delight of students who gathered at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to listen. Earlier, engineers uploaded the song to the rover, which landed near the equator of Mars, and played it back _ a journey of some 700 million miles. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

The song had been uploaded to the rover, which landed near the of Mars, and played it back—a journey of some 700 million miles.

The musician, who promotes science and , was among more than a dozen celebrities who were invited to JPL to watch Curiosity's landing earlier this month. Others included Wil Wheaton, Seth Green and Morgan Freeman.

Will.I.Am, with Black Eyed Peas, speaks at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012, in Pasadena, Calif. The NASA rover Curiosity beamed to Earth his new song "Reach for the Stars" on Tuesday in the first music broadcast from another planet, to the delight of students who gathered at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to listen. Earlier, engineers uploaded the song to the rover, which landed near the equator of Mars, and played it back -- a journey of some 700 million miles. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

In 2008, NASA beamed the Beatles' "Across the Universe" into the cosmos to commemorate the of the song.

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Kafpauzo
3.5 / 5 (2) Aug 28, 2012
So now Curiosity has relayed a speech and a song. What's next?

Maybe they should turn Curiosity into a Web server. This way you'd get to experience the enormous interplanetary expanse first-hand!

You request a Web page that resides on Curiosity, and it takes half an hour of light-speed request-return time to get the text.

And then you have to wait another half-hour for the ads and images.

That's how huge the distances are for the moment. Over time, the delays would vary quite a lot, depending on where the two planets are in their orbits.

What else could they do, to keep interest alive?

There's my previous idea, that they might turn the accelerometers (or the wind sensor, come to think of it) into terrible-quality microphones, by sampling them at a fierce pace.

What else could they do?
ab3a
not rated yet Aug 28, 2012
AMSAT-DL has had the P5A mission to Mars in development for a few years now. See http://www.ticket...ion.html

If and when they launch it, I will have to restrain myself to keep from erecting a large dish in my hay field to monitor it.
Pierebean
not rated yet Aug 29, 2012
Sorry to crush the party but I fail to see the scientific feat of this song broadcasting.
Is it not completely equivalent to send high-resolution pictures from Mars?
Was the song uploaded before the Rover landed on Mars?
FMA
1 / 5 (1) Aug 29, 2012
The picture looks so unreal, isn't it?

How come the sky in Mars is white in color? It seems the photo has been "photshopped"!!

What actually make the color of the sky, angle of incident of the light, sea of the earth? what would be the color of the sky on moon in the daytime?
yyz
1 / 5 (1) Aug 29, 2012
"How come the sky in Mars is white in color?"

The colors of the Martian surface in the first photo have been adjusted to appear more like what we'd see under natural Earth-like illumination. This helps mission scientists to identify different rock types while at the same time increasing apparent contrast and giving the background sky its milky appearance.

Here's an image of the area approximating "natural" Martian illumination: http://photojourn...fig1.jpg

Note that the sky still appears pretty bright, possibly due in part to local Martian dust storms that were present near the landing site in the weeks before landing.
FMA
1 / 5 (1) Aug 29, 2012
Thanks!! yyz :) have a nice day!!