Canada's 'dynamic duo' for Webb telescope

Aug 20, 2012 By Rob Gutro

(Phys.org) -- A "Dynamic Duo" from Canada is the latest topic of the "Behind the Webb" series of videos, which goes behind the scenes to highlight technology in NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

The dynamic duo is actually a combination instrument consisting of the Fine (FGS) and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) science instrument. The FGS will enable the telescope to accurately and precisely point at the correct, intended objects for it to observe. The FGS is packaged together as a single unit with the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) .

The video called "Canada's Dynamic Duo" is part of an on-going about the Webb telescope called "Behind the Webb." It was produced at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md. and takes viewers behind the scenes with scientists and engineers who are creating the Webb telescope's components.

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) developed the Webb’s Fine Guidance Sensor and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph. The FGS will direct the telescope precisely, allowing it to study stars and planets forming in other stellar systems. Both were designed, built and tested by COM DEV International in Ottawa and Cambridge, Ontario, Canada with technical contributions from the University of Montréal and the National Research Council Canada, and scientific guidance of the FGS science team.

During the three minute and 16 second video, STScI host Mary Estacion interviewed Karl Saad at the Canadian Space Agency’s David Florida Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada.

Mary takes the viewer to the thermal vacuum chamber where the FGS/NIRISS was tested in an environment to simulate the vacuum of space and also the cold environment in which it’s going to operate. Viewers will also learn about star-tracking software that is used by the Fine Guidance aSensor.

Explore further: SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The MIRI infrared instrument has two faces

Mar 29, 2012

A short new video takes viewers behind the scenes with the MIRI or the Mid-Infrared Instrument that will fly on-board NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. MIRI is a state-of-the-art infrared instrument that ...

Webb telescope gets 'golden touch'

Jul 30, 2012

(Phys.org) -- NASA technology does some amazing things. Imagine taking one-tenth of an ounce of gold and spreading it so thin that it completely coats something over four feet in diameter. That's what scientists ...

Recommended for you

SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

23 hours ago

The sun emitted a mid-level flare on Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:58 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts ...

Why is Venus so horrible?

Dec 19, 2014

Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you ...

Image: Christmas wrapping the Sentinel-3A antenna

Dec 19, 2014

The moment a team of technicians, gowned like hospital surgeons, wraps the Sentinel-3A radar altimeter in multilayer insulation to protect it from the temperature extremes found in Earth orbit.

Video: Flying over Becquerel

Dec 19, 2014

This latest release from the camera on ESA's Mars Express is a simulated flight over the Becquerel crater, showing large-scale deposits of sedimentary material.

Spinning up a dust devil on Mars

Dec 19, 2014

Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.