Belgium consults other countries on reactor flaw

August 16, 2012

(AP) — The Belgian nuclear regulatory agency has updated other countries on possible hairline cracks found in the steel vessel housing the reactor at a nuclear plant near Antwerp.

The head of the Agence Federal de Controle Nucleaire — the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control — also used a meeting Thursday as a forum where officials could share their expertise on vessel integrity and inspections.

The "flaw indications" were found by ultrasound when the plant was closed for a recent safety inspection. Agency head Willy De Roovere said such inspections are carried out on Belgian nuclear plants every 12-18 months.

The technical experts invited to the meeting came from the U.S., France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Sweden and the U.K.

De Roovere said there was no danger to the public.

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