Americans worry about water use in energy production, survey says

Aug 27, 2012 by Benjamin Wermund

Many Americans are concerned about the amount of water being used in energy production as much of the country continues to struggle with drought, according to a new survey.

About 81 percent of Americans surveyed are concerned about "increased drought, wildfires and other in the United States," according to survey results released by the Civil Society Institute, a nonprofit think tank that aims to serve as a "catalyst for change by creating problem-solving interactions among people, and between communities, government and business that can help to improve society."

The survey focused on Americans' perception of the connection between clean water and energy in view of the drought and found that shortages of safe drinking water due to drought and "the diversion of water for " is the top concern in the 10 drought-stricken states the survey focused on.

The of more than 2,500 adults across the country, showed that three out of four Americans think that "with all the current concern about severe drought and the risk of , America needs to start focusing more on , such as wind and solar, that require less water."

"A strong majority of Americans want to see a shift toward cleaner energy," Pam Solo, president of the Civil Society Institute, said in a teleconference about the survey results Thursday.

According to a 2005 study by the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Science School, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 49 percent of total water use in the U.S.

Solo said the survey shows that the drought has Americans focusing more than ever on .

"This summer was a real game-changer," Solo said.

Explore further: UN sends team to clean up Bangladesh oil spill

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Airlift for drought-stricken Pacific island

Oct 07, 2011

New Zealand and Australia will Friday begin an airlift to help supply fresh water to the tiny drought-stricken Pacific nation of Tuvalu, which is under a state of emergency due to the crisis.

China drought leaves millions short of water

Mar 17, 2010

Millions of people face drinking water shortages in southwestern China because of a once-a-century drought that has dried up rivers and threatens vast farmlands, state media reported Wednesday.

Recommended for you

UN sends team to clean up Bangladesh oil spill

5 hours ago

The United Nations said Thursday it has sent a team of international experts to Bangladesh to help clean up the world's largest mangrove forest, more than a week after it was hit by a huge oil spill.

How will climate change transform agriculture?

6 hours ago

Climate change impacts will require major but very uncertain transformations of global agriculture systems by mid-century, according to new research from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

Report: Radiation leak at nuclear dump was small

6 hours ago

A final report by independent researchers shows the radiation leak from the federal government's underground nuclear waste repository in southern New Mexico was small and localized.

Confucian thought and China's environmental dilemmas

10 hours ago

Conventional wisdom holds that China - the world's most populous country - is an inveterate polluter, that it puts economic goals above conservation in every instance. So China's recent moves toward an apparent ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Aug 28, 2012
It would be nice if there were some way to capture the excess heat and turn it into more electric energy. Reduce/eliminate vaporization.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Aug 28, 2012
It would be nice if there were some way to capture the excess heat and turn it into more electric energy.

Carnot cycle says: no.
But the cooling towers are already an attempt to reclaim as much as possible.

But you can use the heated steam to heat homes within a reasonable radius or provide heat to nearby industrial processes.

tadchem
not rated yet Aug 28, 2012
I strongly suspect that this 'survey' asked leading questions to obtain the reported results, invalidating the work entirely. It seems unreasonable to expect that "the diversion of water for energy production" is high on the list of worries, even for drought-stricken states, when so much energy production is performed with little or no requirement for "diversion of water."

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.